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Does the REIT Stock Market Resemble the General Stock Market?



Gyourko and Keim (1993) point out that the continued growth of the Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) market depends critically on the stock market's ability to provide fair and accurate valuations of real estate. Given the recent surge of REIT initial public offerings (more than $15 billion in the 1993-1994 period), it is important to know whether the stock market provides the REIT market with the same level of information dissemination, monitoring activities, and pricing mechanisms as that for other stocks. This study demonstrates that, when compared with the general stock market, REIT stocks tend to have a smaller turnover ratio, a lower level of institutional investor participation, and are followed by fewer security analysts. Furthermore, the level of financial analysts coverage and stock turnover intensity are higher when the REIT stock market is "hot." The lack of attention from financial analysts and institutional investors in the REIT stock market may have some implications for the well-documented anomalous REIT stock performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Ko Wang & John Erickson & Su Han Chan, 1995. "Does the REIT Stock Market Resemble the General Stock Market?," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 10(4), pages 445-460.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:10:n:5:1994:p:445-460

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    1. repec:bla:joares:v:6:y:1968:i::p:67-92 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Allen, Paul R. & Sirmans, C. F., 1987. "An analysis of gains to acquiring firm's shareholders : The special case of REITs," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 175-184, March.
    3. Brennan, Michael J & Hughes, Patricia J, 1991. " Stock Prices and the Supply of Information," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(5), pages 1665-1691, December.
    4. Blume, Lawrence & Easley, David & O'Hara, Maureen, 1994. " Market Statistics and Technical Analysis: The Role of Volume," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 153-181, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierpaolo Pattitoni & Barbara Petracci & Massimo Spisni, 2011. "Fee Structure, Financing, and Investment Decisions: The Case of REITs," Working Paper series 30_11, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    2. David Ling & Milena Petrova, 2011. "Why Do REITs Go Private? Differences in Target Characteristics, Acquirer Motivations, and Wealth Effects in Public and Private Acquisitions," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 99-129, July.
    3. Su Han Chan & Wai Kin Leung & Ko Wang, 1998. "Institutional Investment in REITs: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 16(3), pages 357-374.
    4. Ming-Long Lee & Ming-Te Lee & Kevin Chiang, 2008. "Real Estate Risk Exposure of Equity Real Estate Investment Trusts," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 165-181, February.
    5. Paul Anglin & Robert Edelstein & Yanmin Gao & Desmond Tsang, 2011. "How Does Corporate Governance Affect the Quality of Investor Information? The Curious Case of REITs," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 33(1), pages 1-24.
    6. Dirk Brounen & Piet Eichholtz & David Ling, 2009. "The Liquidity of Property Shares: An International Comparison," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 37(3), pages 413-445.
    7. Erik Devos & Seow Ong & Andrew Spieler, 2007. "Analyst Activity and Firm Value: Evidence from the REIT Sector," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 333-356, October.
    8. Xing, Xuejing & Anderson, Randy I. & Hu, Yan, 2016. "What׳s a name worth? The impact of a likeable stock ticker symbol on firm value," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 63-80.
    9. Benjamin Blau & Jared F. Egginton & Matthew Hill, 2016. "REITs and market friction," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 1-24, January.
    10. Elizabeth Devos & Erik Devos & Seow Eng Ong & Andrew C. Spieler, 2016. "Who Follows REITs?," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 38(1), pages 129-164.

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    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services


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