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The new economic governance framework of the European Union

Author

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  • Ioana - Sorina MIHUȚ

    (Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Babeș-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania)

Abstract

There is a general agreement that the European Union is facing nowadays one of the most important challenges in the history of the community, taking into consideration the wide range of economic, social and political risks that constitute top priorities of the European authorities. One key concept in this approach is the efficiency of the economic governance process. The main purpose of this article is to evaluate the ability of the European Union to elaborate sound policies in the current economic framework that are focusing on supporting the common interests of all the Member States, with particular focus on the economic governance process. Furthermore, the article targets at identifying whether or not the new architecture of the EU economic governance developed as a result of the 2008 financial crisis constitute a triggering factor for social cohesion and political harmonization across the European community.

Suggested Citation

  • Ioana - Sorina MIHUȚ, 2018. "The new economic governance framework of the European Union," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 10(2), pages 182-197, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:jes:wpaper:y:2018:v:10:i:2:p:182-197
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    File URL: http://ceswp.uaic.ro/articles/CESWP2018_X2_MIH.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aidt, Toke & Dutta, Jayasri & Sena, Vania, 2008. "Governance regimes, corruption and growth: Theory and evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 195-220, June.
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    3. Jong-A-Pin, Richard, 2009. "On the measurement of political instability and its impact on economic growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 15-29, March.
    4. Soukiazis, Elias & Castro, Vitor, 2005. "How the Maastricht criteria and the Stability and Growth Pact affected real convergence in the European Union: A panel data analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 385-399, April.
    5. Jacques Delors, 2013. "Economic Governance in the European Union: Past, Present and Future," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 169-178, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic governance; macroeconomic policies; economic governance; government quality; institutions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

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