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Are US imports really hurting US households?: an analysis of the relationship between US households' consumption and US imports

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  • Florence Bouvet
  • Chong-Uk Kim

Abstract

This paper seeks evidence of the relationship between US households' consumption and imports, notably imports from China. Using MSA-level data from the consumer expenditure survey from 1986 to 2007, we find that in general imports, and especially those from China, are positively related with households' consumption. A one-percentage point increase in the size of imports relative to GDP increases consumption (total and non-durable goods consumption) by 2%. This positive relationship is stronger for imports from China.

Suggested Citation

  • Florence Bouvet & Chong-Uk Kim, 2014. "Are US imports really hurting US households?: an analysis of the relationship between US households' consumption and US imports," Global Business and Economics Review, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 16(2), pages 157-178.
  • Handle: RePEc:ids:gbusec:v:16:y:2014:i:2:p:157-178
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    References listed on IDEAS

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