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Brain drain: Propulsive factors and consequences

Author

Listed:
  • Dragan ILIC

    () (Faculty of Economics and Engineering Management , Cvecarska 2, Novi Sad, 21000, Republic of Serbia)

  • Marko Milosavljevic

    () (Faculty of Economics and Engineering Management , Cvecarska 2, Novi Sad, 21000, Republic of Serbia)

Abstract

When speaking about the total number of highly educated individuals’ migration, it is easy to spot that it is rapidly increasing. The brain drain issues should be taken very seriously especially in under developed and in the developing countries, knowing that the human capital is globally mobile and that highly educated individuals can without any issues market their knowledge around the globe. Dealing with it requires a carefully tailored strategy for these countries, which are suffering from severe human capital losses on annual basis. Since the labour markets of today are highly competitive, it is necessary for these countries to secure good advancement and doing business opportunities. The purpose of this research is to provide an insight into the key propulsive factors and potential consequences caused by the brain drain. The method used in order to conduct the research was a carefully designed questionnaire taken by the date subject enrolled at the third and fourth years of state governed and privately owned universities. This research shows that one of the key reasons for brain drain in underdeveloped and in the developing countries is shortage of further educational advancement opportunities.

Suggested Citation

  • Dragan ILIC & Marko Milosavljevic, 2017. "Brain drain: Propulsive factors and consequences," International Conference on Economic Sciences and Business Administration, Spiru Haret University, vol. 4(1), pages 198-203, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:icb:wpaper:v:4:y:2017:i:1:198-203
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    File URL: http://icesba.eu/RePEc/icb/wpaper/ICESBA2017_Ilic_P198-203.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Abdeslam Marfouk, 2007. "Brain Drain in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 193-218, June.
    2. Andrew Mountford & Hillel Rapoport, 2007. "The Brain Drain and the World Distribution of Income and Population," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0704, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Michel Beine & Fréderic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2008. "Brain Drain and Human Capital Formation in Developing Countries: Winners and Losers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 631-652, April.
    4. Docquier, Frédéric, 2006. "Brain Drain and Inequality Across Nations," IZA Discussion Papers 2440, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Straubhaar, Thomas, 2000. "International Mobility of the Highly Skilled: Brain Gain, Brain Drain or Brain Exchange," Discussion Paper Series 26296, Hamburg Institute of International Economics.
    6. Straubhaar, Thomas, 2000. "International mobility of the highly skilled: Brain gain, brain drain or brain exchange," HWWA Discussion Papers 88, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    brain drain; family income; higher education; students;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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