IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jsusta/v4y2012i9p2176-2208d19998.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Climate Change Adaptation Planning Process for Low-Lying, Communities Vulnerable to Sea Level Rise

Author

Listed:
  • Sara Barron

    () (Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia, 2321–2260 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada;)

  • Glenis Canete

    () (Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia, 2321–2260 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada;)

  • Jeff Carmichael

    () (Metro Vancouver, Burnaby, BC V5H 2C8, Canada)

  • David Flanders

    () (Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia, 2321–2260 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada;)

  • Ellen Pond

    () (CALP Affiliate, Pembina Institute, #610-55 Water St., Vancouver, BC V6B 1A1, Canada)

  • Stephen Sheppard

    () (Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia, 2321–2260 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada;)

  • Kristi Tatebe

    () (Collaborative for Advanced Landscape Planning, University of British Columbia, 2321–2260 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada;)

Abstract

While the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada, provides guidelines for flood risk management, it is local governments’ responsibility to delineate their own flood vulnerability, assess their risk, and integrate these with planning policies to implement adaptive action. However, barriers such as the lack of locally specific data and public perceptions about adaptation options mean that local governments must address the need for adaptation planning within a context of scientific uncertainty, while building public support for difficult choices on flood-related climate policy and action. This research demonstrates a process to model, visualize and evaluate potential flood impacts and adaptation options for the community of Delta, in Metro Vancouver, across economic, social and environmental perspectives. Visualizations in 2D and 3D, based on hydrological modeling of breach events for existing dike infrastructure, future sea level rise and storm surges, are generated collaboratively, together with future adaptation scenarios assessed against quantitative and qualitative indicators. This ‘visioning package’ is being used with staff and a citizens’ Working Group to assess the performance, policy implications and social acceptability of the adaptation strategies. Recommendations based on the experience of the initiative are provided that can facilitate sustainable future adaptation actions and decision-making in Delta and other jurisdictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Barron & Glenis Canete & Jeff Carmichael & David Flanders & Ellen Pond & Stephen Sheppard & Kristi Tatebe, 2012. "A Climate Change Adaptation Planning Process for Low-Lying, Communities Vulnerable to Sea Level Rise," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(9), pages 1-33, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:9:p:2176-2208:d:19998
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/4/9/2176/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/4/9/2176/
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barry Smit & Ian Burton & Richard Klein & J. Wandel, 2000. "An Anatomy of Adaptation to Climate Change and Variability," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 223-251, April.
    2. Alistair Hunt & Paul Watkiss, 2011. "Climate change impacts and adaptation in cities: a review of the literature," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 13-49, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:jenvss:v:8:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13412-017-0443-8 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    adaptation; climate change; vulnerability; flooding; inundation; planning process; participatory planning; resilience; sea level rise; visualization; integrated assessment;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:9:p:2176-2208:d:19998. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: http://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.