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A Social-Ecological System Framework for Marine Aquaculture Research

Author

Listed:
  • Teresa R. Johnson

    () (School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Kate Beard

    () (School of Computing and Information Science, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Damian C. Brady

    () (School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Carrie J. Byron

    () (School of Marine Programs, University of New England, Biddeford, ME 04005, USA)

  • Caitlin Cleaver

    () (Ecology and Environmental Sciences Program, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Kevin Duffy

    () (Department of Communication and Journalism, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Nicholas Keeney

    () (School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Melissa Kimble

    () (School of Computing and Information Science, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Molly Miller

    () (Ecology and Environmental Sciences Program, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Shane Moeykens

    () (Maine EPSCoR Office, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Mario Teisl

    () (School of Economics, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • G. Peter van Walsum

    () (Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

  • Jing Yuan

    () (School of Computing and Information Science, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA)

Abstract

Aquaculture has been responsible for an impressive growth in the global supply of seafood. As of 2016, more than half of all global seafood production comes from aquaculture. To meet future global seafood demands, there is need and opportunity to expand marine aquaculture production in ways that are both socially and ecologically sustainable. This requires integrating biophysical, social, and engineering sciences. Such interdisciplinary research is difficult due to the complexity and multi-scale aspects of marine aquaculture and inherent challenges researchers face working across disciplines. To this end, we developed a framework based on Elinor Ostrom’s social–ecological system framework (SESF) to guide interdisciplinary research on marine aquaculture. We first present the framework and the social–ecological system variables relevant to research on marine aquaculture and then illustrate one application of this framework to interdisciplinary research underway in Maine, the largest producer of marine aquaculture products in the United States. We use the framework to compare oyster aquaculture in two study regions, with a focus on factors influencing the social and biophysical carrying capacity. We conclude that the flexibility provided by the SESF is well suited to inform interdisciplinary research on marine aquaculture, especially comparative, cross-case analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Teresa R. Johnson & Kate Beard & Damian C. Brady & Carrie J. Byron & Caitlin Cleaver & Kevin Duffy & Nicholas Keeney & Melissa Kimble & Molly Miller & Shane Moeykens & Mario Teisl & G. Peter van Walsu, 2019. "A Social-Ecological System Framework for Marine Aquaculture Research," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-20, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:9:p:2522-:d:227446
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Byron, Carrie & Bengtson, David & Costa-Pierce, Barry & Calanni, John, 2011. "Integrating science into management: Ecological carrying capacity of bivalve shellfish aquaculture," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 363-370, May.
    2. Gibbs, Mark T., 2009. "Implementation barriers to establishing a sustainable coastal aquaculture sector," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 83-89, January.
    3. Edella Schlager & Elinor Ostrom, 1992. "Property-Rights Regimes and Natural Resources: A Conceptual Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(3), pages 249-262.
    4. Byron, Carrie & Link, Jason & Costa-Pierce, Barry & Bengtson, David, 2011. "Calculating ecological carrying capacity of shellfish aquaculture using mass-balance modeling: Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island," Ecological Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 222(10), pages 1743-1755.
    5. Geret S. DePiper & Douglas W. Lipton & Romuald N. Lipcius, 2017. "Valuing Ecosystem Services: Oysters, Denitrification, and Nutrient Trading Programs," Marine Resource Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(1), pages 1-20.
    6. Achim Schlüter & Sarah Wise & Kathleen Schwerdtner Mánez & Gabriela Weber De Morais & Marion Glaser, 2013. "Institutional Change, Sustainability and the Sea," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(12), pages 1-18, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    marine aquaculture; social-ecological systems; interdisciplinary research; social-ecological system framework; aquaculture; oyster aquaculture;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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