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Development of Economic Integration in the Central Yangtze River Megaregion from the Perspective of Urban Network Evolution

Author

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  • Dan He

    () (Center for Modern Chinese City Studies, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China
    School of Urban and Regional Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China)

  • Zhijing Sun

    () (School of Urban and Regional Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China)

  • Peng Gao

    () (Center for Modern Chinese City Studies, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China
    School of Urban and Regional Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China)

Abstract

Megaregions are the new engines of global and regional economic growth, and they often are considered a principal urbanization platform in China. To understand megaregional processes’ responses to China’s regional policies, this study focused on two aspects of integration development in the Central Yangtze River megaregion between 2000 and 2014: The internal collaborative networks using enterprises’ headquarters-branch locations as a proxy measurement and the role of regional transportation in the integration networks. Based on a three-step network analysis, the Central Yangtze River megaregion was increasingly similar to a polycentric urban system with Wuhan, Changsha, and Nanchang as the dominant service cities, and there were some indications of a preliminary urban network formation. However, integration development remained a government-led administrative process with administrative boundaries that significantly influenced the network structure. A panel regression analysis further suggested that transportation accessibility to the three central cities was the key determinant of network participation for the peripheral cities compared to economic performance. This work contributes to the debate on the hierarchical-administrative properties of China’s megaregions and transportation implications of the economic integration process.

Suggested Citation

  • Dan He & Zhijing Sun & Peng Gao, 2019. "Development of Economic Integration in the Central Yangtze River Megaregion from the Perspective of Urban Network Evolution," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(19), pages 1-18, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:19:p:5401-:d:272079
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anoraga Jatayu & Ernan Rustiadi & Didit Okta Pribadi, 2020. "A Quantitative Approach to Characterizing the Changes and Managing Urban Form for Sustaining the Suburb of a Mega-Urban Region: The Case of North Cianjur," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(19), pages 1-21, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    regional integration; intra-firm network; transportation accessibility; megaregions;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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