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Who buys Treasury securities at auction?


  • Michael J. Fleming


The U.S. Treasury Department now releases fuller information about its auctions than in the past, including new information on investor class and bidder category. The investor class data shed light on the distribution of demand for government securities, and the bidder category data, released first, offer an early read on demand. Purchases by indirect bidders, in particular, are a fairly good proxy for foreign purchases of Treasury notes, but not Treasury bills.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael J. Fleming, 2007. "Who buys Treasury securities at auction?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 13(Jan).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:y:2007:i:jan:n:v.13no.1

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jason Bram & Andrew F. Haughwout & James A. Orr, 2002. "Has September 11 affected New York City's growth potential?," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Nov, pages 81-96.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Chaboud, Alain P. & Chiquoine, Benjamin & Hjalmarsson, Erik & Loretan, Mico, 2010. "Frequency of observation and the estimation of integrated volatility in deep and liquid financial markets," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 212-240, March.
    2. Michael J. Fleming & Joshua V. Rosenberg, 2007. "How do treasury dealers manage their positions?," Staff Reports 299, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Brenner, Menachem & Galai, Dan & Sade, Orly, 2009. "Sovereign debt auctions: Uniform or discriminatory?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 267-274, March.
    4. Bahamin, Payam & Cebula, Richard & Foley, Maggie & Houmes, Robert, 2011. "The Demand for Treasury Securities at Auction," MPRA Paper 52026, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Tchuindjo, Leonard, 2015. "Pre-auction short positions and impacts on primary dealers’ bidding behavior in US Treasury auctions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 193-201.
    6. Warren B. Hrunga & Jason S. Seligman, 2015. "Responses to the Financial Crisis, Treasury Debt, and the Impact on Short-Term Money Markets," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(1), pages 151-190, January.
    7. Rydqvist, Kristian & Wu, Mark, 2016. "Pre-auction inventory and bidding behavior: Evidence from Canadian Treasury auctions," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 78-102.
    8. Rydqvist, Kristian & Wu, Mark, 2014. "Pre-Auction Inventory and Bidding Behavior—An Analysis of Canadian Treasury Auctions," CEPR Discussion Papers 10112, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Dong Lou & Hongjun Yan & Jinfan Zhang, 2013. "Anticipated and Repeated Shocks in Liquid Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(8), pages 1891-1912.
    10. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Walker Ray, 2017. "The Effects of Quantitative Easing: Taking a Cue from Treasury Auctions," NBER Working Papers 24122, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jagannathan, Ravi & Jirnyi, Andrei & Sherman, Ann Guenther, 2015. "Share auctions of initial public offerings: Global evidence," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 283-311.


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