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Changes in hours worked since 1950

Author

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  • Ellen R. McGrattan
  • Richard Rogerson

Abstract

Changes in hours worked since 1950; This article describes changes in the number of average weekly hours of market work per person in the United States since World War II. Overall, this number has been roughly constant; for various groups, however, it has shifted dramatically from males to females, from older people to younger people, and from single- to married-person households. The article provides a unique look at how the lifetime pattern of work hours has changed since 1950 for different demographic groups. The article also documents several factors that may be related to the changes in hours worked: simultaneous changes in Social Security benefits, fertility rates, and family structure. The data presented are based on those collected by the U.S. Bureau of the Census during the 1950_90 decennial censuses.

Suggested Citation

  • Ellen R. McGrattan & Richard Rogerson, 1998. "Changes in hours worked since 1950," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 2-19.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmqr:y:1998:i:win:p:2-19:n:v.22no.1
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Keane, 2011. "Income Taxation in a Life Cycle Model with Human Capital," Working Papers 201117, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales.
    2. Michael P. Keane, 2016. "Life‐cycle Labour Supply with Human Capital: Econometric and Behavioural Implications," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(592), pages 546-577, May.
    3. Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira & Marcelo Rodrigues dos Santos, 2013. "The Effect of Social Security, Health, Demography and Technology on Retirement," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(2), pages 350-370, April.
    4. Ellen R. McGrattan & Richard Rogerson, 2004. "Changes in hours worked, 1950?2000," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Jul, pages 14-33.
    5. Ferreira, Pedro Cavalcanti & Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues dos, 2008. "The effect of social security, demography and technology on retirement," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 683, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    6. Jeremy Greenwood & Nezih Guner, 2009. "Marriage and Divorce since World War II: Analyzing the Role of Technological Progress on the Formation of Households," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2008, Volume 23, pages 231-276 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Fatih Guvenen & Michelle Rendall, 2015. "Women's Emancipation through Education: A Macroeconomic Analysis," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(4), pages 931-956, October.
    8. Morten Lau & Panu Poutvaara & Andreas Wagener, 2002. "The Dynamic Cost of Draft," Public Economics 0210001, EconWPA.
    9. Michael P. Keane, 2015. "Effects Of Permanent And Transitory Tax Changes In A Life‐Cycle Labor Supply Model With Human Capital," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 485-503, May.
    10. Seshadri, Ananth & Yuki, Kazuhiro, 2004. "Equity and efficiency effects of redistributive policies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(7), pages 1415-1447, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor supply ; Labor market;

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