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Has forward guidance been effective?

Author

Listed:
  • Thealexa Becker
  • Andrew Lee Smith

Abstract

A. Lee Smith and Thealexa Becker compare forward guidance announcements with changes in the effective federal funds rate and find the two policy measures have had similar macroeconomic effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Thealexa Becker & Andrew Lee Smith, 2015. "Has forward guidance been effective?," Macro Bulletin, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 1-3, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkmb:00030
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Connolly & Taeyoung Doh, 2013. "Has the effect of monetary policy announcements on asset prices changed?," Macro Bulletin, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 3-4, September.
    2. Milton Friedman, 1961. "The Lag in Effect of Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69, pages 447-447.
    3. Travis J. Berge & Guangye Cao, 2014. "Global effects of U.S. monetary policy: is unconventional policy different?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I, pages 5-31.
    4. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    5. Michael D. Bauer & Glenn D. Rudebusch, 2014. "The Signaling Channel for Federal Reserve Bond Purchases," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(3), pages 233-289, September.
    6. Olivier Coibion, 2012. "Are the Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks Big or Small?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 1-32, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Brent Bundick, 2015. "Estimating the Monetary Policy Rule Perceived by Forecasters," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q IV, pages 33-49.
    2. Christian Pfister & Jean-Guillaume Sahuc, 2020. "Unconventional monetary policies: A stock-taking exercise," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 130(2), pages 137-169.
    3. Richhild Moessner & David-Jan Jansen & Jakob de Haan, 2017. "Communication About Future Policy Rates In Theory And Practice: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(3), pages 678-711, July.
    4. Brubakk, Leif & ter Ellen, Saskia & Robstad, Ørjan & Xu, Hong, 2019. "The macroeconomic effects of forward communication," Working Paper 2019/20, Norges Bank.
    5. Alex Isakov & Petr Grishin & Oleg Gorlinsky, 2018. "Fear of Forward Guidance," Russian Journal of Money and Finance, Bank of Russia, vol. 77(4), pages 84-106, December.
    6. Jeffrey R. Campbell & Thomas B. King & Anna Orlik & Rebecca Zarutskie, 2020. "Issues Regarding the Use of the Policy Rate Tool," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-070, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Hanna O. Sakhno, 2018. "Central Bank Communication In The Xxi Century: A Survey Of Theory And Evidence," HSE Working papers WP BRP 16/PSP/2018, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    8. Ralf Fendel & Jan Heins & Oliver Mohr, 2020. "The Effect of the ECB’s Forward Guidance on Interest Rate Forecasts," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 12(8), pages 1-52, August.
    9. Hardik A. Marfatia & Rangan Gupta & Keagile Lesame, 2020. "Dynamic Impact of Unconventional Monetary Policy on International REITs," Working Papers 202020, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    QE;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects

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