IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The case of the missing M2

  • John V. Duca

Since the third quarter of 1990, the growth of M2 in the United States has been weaker than econometric models predicted. John V. Duca assesses whether this shortfall in M2 growth is associated with inflows into bond and equity mutual funds or the thrift resolution process. ; Duca finds that while, to some degree, bond funds are good substitutes for M2, bond and equity funds do not account for the shortfall. Most of the missing M2, he concludes, appears to be related to activity of the Resolution Trust Corporation. Duca reasons that resolution procedures can depress M2 in ways not reflected in standard models, such as by forcing an early call of small time deposits and by imparting the risk of prepayment to small time deposits.

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its journal Economic and Financial Policy Review.

Volume (Year): (1992)
Issue (Month): Q II ()
Pages: 1-24

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:fip:fedder:y:1992:i:qii:p:1-24
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.dallasfed.org/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

Order Information: Email:


References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Hetzel, Robert L & Mehra, Yash P, 1989. "The Behavior of Money Demand in the 1980s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(4), pages 455-63, November.
  2. Duca, John V., 1992. "US business credit sources, demand deposits, and the 'missing money'," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 567-583, June.
  3. Fred Furlong & Bharat Trehan, 1990. "Interpreting recent money growth," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue sep28.
  4. Milbourne, Ross, 1986. "Financial Innovation and the Demand for Liquid Assets: A Note," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 18(4), pages 506-11, November.
  5. Stephen M. Goldfeld, 1976. "The Case of the Missing Money," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 7(3), pages 683-740.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedder:y:1992:i:qii:p:1-24. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Delia Rodriguez)

The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Delia Rodriguez to update the entry or send us the correct address

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.