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How useful is M2 today?

Author

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  • Robert L. Hetzel

Abstract

One of the most difficult aspects of formulating monetary policy is assessing the impact of policy actions on the public's dollar spending. Historically, the behavior of M2 has offered considerable information about the impact of monetary policy on dollar spending. It appears likely that M2 will continue to offer useful information to the policymaker.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert L. Hetzel, 1992. "How useful is M2 today?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sep, pages 12-25.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrer:y:1992:i:sep:p:12-25:n:v.78no.5
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    File URL: https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/files/docs/publications/frbrichreview/rev_frbrich199209.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Balke, Nathan S & Gordon, Robert J, 1989. "The Estimation of Prewar Gross National Product: Methodology and New Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(1), pages 38-92, February.
    2. John P. Judd & Bharat Trehan, 1992. "Money, credit, and M2," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue sep4.
    3. John V. Duca, 1992. "The case of the missing M2," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q II, pages 1-24.
    4. Granger, C. W. J. & Newbold, P., 1974. "Spurious regressions in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 111-120, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Darin & Robert L. Hetzel, 1994. "A shift-adjusted M2 indicator for monetary policy," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 25-48.
    2. Robert L. Hetzel, 2004. "How do central banks control inflation?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 46-63.
    3. Scheide, Joachim, 1993. "Geldmenge, Einkommen und Preisniveau: wie stabil ist der Zusammenhang nach der deutschen Wiedervereinigung?," Kiel Working Papers 582, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Éric Jondeau & Nada Villermain-Lécolier, 1996. "La stabilité de la fonction de demande de monnaie aux Etats-Unis," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 47(5), pages 1121-1148.

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    Keywords

    Money supply;

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