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The welfare gain from the introduction of indexed bonds


  • Alan D. Viard


I examine the welfare gain from the introduction of indexed bonds in zero net supply. I show that trade in indexed bonds enables investors to reallocate existing economic risks in a mutually beneficial manner. The aggregate gain from the introduction of a safe asset is proportional to the variance of the minimum-variance portfolio formed from the risky assets and to the heterogeneity of investors' risk preferences. In an economy with nominal but not indexed bonds, the welfare loss from inflation uncertainty is lowest when inflation is most closely correlated with real returns on other assets. Contrary to popular intuition, the introduction of indexed bonds may reduce saving. Copyright 1993 by Ohio State University Press.
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  • Alan D. Viard, 1993. "The welfare gain from the introduction of indexed bonds," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 612-635.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcpr:y:1993:p:612-635

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sumner, Scott, 1995. "The Impact of Futures Price Targeting on the Precision and Credibility of Monetary Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 89-106, February.
    2. McCallum, Bennett T & Nelson, Edward, 1999. "An Optimizing IS-LM Specification for Monetary Policy and Business Cycle Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(3), pages 296-316, August.
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    5. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
    6. King, Robert G & Watson, Mark W, 1996. "Money, Prices, Interest Rates and the Business Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 35-53, February.
    7. Michael Woodford, 1996. "Control of the Public Debt: A Requirement for Price Stability?," NBER Working Papers 5684, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Roberts, John M, 1995. "New Keynesian Economics and the Phillips Curve," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 975-984, November.
    9. David Mayes & Brendon Riches, 1996. "The effectiveness of monetary policy in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 59, March.
    10. Yun, Tack, 1996. "Nominal price rigidity, money supply endogeneity, and business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 345-370, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. LuisM. Viceira & John Y. Campbell, 2001. "Who Should Buy Long-Term Bonds?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 99-127, March.
    2. David Eagle, 2005. "Completing Markets in a One-Good, Pure Exchange Economy Without State-Contingent Securities," Finance 0501009, EconWPA.
    3. Jeffrey R. Brown & Olivia S. Mitchell & James M. Poterba, 2001. "The Role of Real Annuities and Indexed Bonds in an Individual Accounts Retirement Program," NBER Chapters,in: Risk Aspects of Investment-Based Social Security Reform, pages 321-370 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Pu Shen, 1995. "Benefits and limitations of inflation indexed Treasury bonds," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III, pages 41-56.
    5. Peters, David W., 2007. "The behavior of government of Canada real return bond returns," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 152-171.
    6. Juan Angel Garcia & Adrian van Rixtel, 2007. "Inflation-linked bonds from a central bank perspective," Occasional Papers 0705, Banco de EspaƱa;Occasional Papers Homepage.

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    Bonds ; Inflation (Finance);


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