IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ere/journl/vxxxvy2016i2p123-150.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Do Technology-Intensive Activities Drive Industrial Labor Productivity Levels?

Author

Listed:
  • Raúl Vázquez López

    () (Institute of Economic Research (IIEc.) - National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). Mexico City.)

Abstract

This article analyzes the contribution of technology-intensive activities to the increase in aggregate labor productivity in the industrial sector for a set of 28 countries, dividing 150 industrial classes into four groups based on their degree of technology content (High, Medium-High, Medium-Low and Low). After decomposing the evolution of labor productivity with a statistical method, it was found that these activities did not contribute significantly to the increase in the efficiency indicator. These exercises also corroborate the absence of a global structural change in industry that would drive levels of aggregate labor productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Raúl Vázquez López, 2016. "Do Technology-Intensive Activities Drive Industrial Labor Productivity Levels?," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(2), pages 123-150, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ere:journl:v:xxxv:y:2016:i:2:p:123-150
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.economia.uanl.mx/revistaensayos/xxxv/2/1_Do_technology_Vazquez.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rada, Codrina & von Arnim, Rudiger, 2012. "Structural transformation in China and India: A note on macroeconomic policies," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 264-275.
    2. Nelson, Richard R & Pack, Howard, 1999. "The Asian Miracle and Modern Growth Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(457), pages 416-436, July.
    3. Fagerberg, Jan, 2000. "Technological progress, structural change and productivity growth: a comparative study," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 393-411, December.
    4. Dosi, Giovanni, 1993. "Technological paradigms and technological trajectories : A suggested interpretation of the determinants and directions of technical change," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 102-103, April.
    5. Scherer, F M, 1982. "Inter-Industry Technology Flows and Productivity Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(4), pages 627-634, November.
    6. Arthur, W Brian, 1989. "Competing Technologies, Increasing Returns, and Lock-In by Historical Events," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(394), pages 116-131, March.
    7. Ute Pieper, 2000. "Deindustrialisation and the social and economic sustainability nexus in developing countries: Cross-country evidence on productivity and employment," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(4), pages 66-99.
    8. Leanne Roncolato & David Kucera, 2014. "Structural drivers of productivity and employment growth: a decomposition analysis for 81 countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 399-424.
    9. Ester G. Silva & Aurora A. C. Teixeira, 2011. "Does structure influence growth? A panel data econometric assessment of "relatively less developed" countries, 1979--2003," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 457-510, April.
    10. Timmer, Marcel P. & Szirmai, Adam, 2000. "Productivity growth in Asian manufacturing: the structural bonus hypothesis examined," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 371-392, December.
    11. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-337, May.
    12. Ocampo, José Antonio, 2011. "Macroeconomy for development: countercyclical policies and production sector transformation," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industry; Structural Change; Productivity; Technology Change; Economic Development;

    JEL classification:

    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ere:journl:v:xxxv:y:2016:i:2:p:123-150. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dora María Vega Facio). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/feualmx.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.