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Social housing and location choices of immigrants in France

Author

Listed:
  • Denis Fougère
  • Francis Kramarz
  • Roland Rathelot
  • Mirna Safi

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this study is to examine the empirical links between social housing policy and location choices of immigrants in France. Design/methodology/approach - The study characterizes the main individual and contextual determinants of the probability of immigrants to live in a HLM ( Findings - In general, migrants live more frequently in social housing than French natives, other observables being equal. In particular, this frequency is higher for migrants from Turkey, Morocco, Southeast Asia, Algeria, Tunisia and Sub-Saharan Africa (in decreasing order). Moreover, migrants of all origins live less often in a HLM when the city has plenty of social housing and when the fraction of natives is high. Research limitations/implications - The dataset can only measure statistical association between location choices of immigrants and the supply of social housing units at the local level, in the absence of panel data and instrumental variables. Interpretation in terms of causality is thus not permitted. Originality/value - The dataset used is especially valuable for studying location choices of immigrants, since it allows significant samples of immigrants, according to their country of origin, these groups being generally too small in (French) surveys.

Suggested Citation

  • Denis Fougère & Francis Kramarz & Roland Rathelot & Mirna Safi, 2013. "Social housing and location choices of immigrants in France," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 34(1), pages 56-69, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ijmpps:v:34:y:2013:i:1:p:56-69
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. De Giorgi, Giacomo & Pellizzari, Michele, 2009. "Welfare migration in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 353-363, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Decreuse, Bruno & Schmutz, Benoît & Trannoy, Alain, 2018. "Neighbor discrimination theory and evidence from the French rental market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 104-123.
    2. Miyeon Park & Sungho Tae, 2016. "Suggestions of Policy Direction to Improve the Housing Quality in South Korea," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(5), pages 1-26, May.
    3. Hippolyte d’Albis & Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly, 2019. "International Migration and Regional Housing Markets: Evidence from France," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 42(2), pages 147-180, March.
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:5:p:438:d:69394 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Xiaohong Deng & Lei Gong & Yanfang Gao & Xiaoqing Cui & Ke Xu, 2018. "Internal Differentiation within the Rural Migrant Population from the Sustainable Urban Development Perspective: Evidence from China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(12), pages 1-15, December.
    6. Haley McAvay, 2018. "How Durable Are Ethnoracial Segregation and Spatial Disadvantage? Intergenerational Contextual Mobility in France," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(4), pages 1507-1545, August.
    7. Joan Carles Martori & Philippe Apparicio & André Ngamini Ngui, 2016. "Understanding Immigrant Population Growth Within Urban Areas: A Spatial Econometric Approach," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 215-234, February.
    8. Hippolyte d’Albis & Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly, 2019. "International Migration and Regional Housing Markets: Evidence from France," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 42(2), pages 147-180, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social housing; Immigration; Social magnets; France;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • R38 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Government Policy

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