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Portfolio effects and the willingness to pay for weather insurances

Author

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  • Oliver Musshoff
  • Norbert Hirschauer
  • Martin Odening

Abstract

Since the mid-1990s, agricultural economists have discussed the relevance of index-based insurances, also called “weather derivatives”, as hedging instruments for volumetric risks in agriculture. Motivated by the question of how weather derivatives should be priced for agricultural firms, this paper describes an extended risk-programming model which can be used to determine farmers’ willingness to pay (demand function) for weather derivative’s farm-specific risk reduction capacity and the individual farmer’s risk acceptance. Applying it to the exemplary case of a Brandenburg farm reveals that even a highly standardized contract which is based on the accumulated rainfall at the capital’s meteorological station in Berlin-Tempelhof generates a relevant willingness to pay. Our findings suggest that a potential underwriter could even add a loading on the actuarially fair price which exceeds the level of traditional insurances. Since translation costs are low compared to insurance contracts, this finding indicates there may be a relevant trading potential.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliver Musshoff & Norbert Hirschauer & Martin Odening, 2008. "Portfolio effects and the willingness to pay for weather insurances," Agricultural Finance Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 68(1), pages 83-97, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:afrpps:v:68:y:2008:i:1:p:83-97
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John C. Quiggin & Giannis Karagiannis & J. Stanton, 1993. "Crop Insurance And Crop Production: An Empirical Study Of Moral Hazard And Adverse Selection," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, pages 95-113.
    2. Keith H. Coble & Thomas O. Knight & Rulon D. Pope & Jeffery R. Williams, 1996. "Modeling Farm-Level Crop Insurance Demand with Panel Data," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 439-447.
    3. Bruce A. Babcock & David A. Hennessy, 1996. "Input Demand under Yield and Revenue Insurance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 416-427.
    4. Barnett, Barry J., 2004. "Agricultural Index Insurance Products: Strengths And Limitations," Agricultural Outlook Forum 2004 32971, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Outlook Forum.
    5. Vincent H. Smith & Barry K. Goodwin, 1996. "Crop Insurance, Moral Hazard, and Agricultural Chemical Use," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 428-438.
    6. Moschini, GianCarlo & Hennessy, David, 1999. "Uncertainty, Risk Aversion and Risk Management for Agricultural Producers," ISU General Staff Papers 199907010700001320, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Moschini, Giancarlo & Hennessy, David A., 2001. "Uncertainty, risk aversion, and risk management for agricultural producers," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 88-153 Elsevier.
    8. Goodwin, Barry K., 1994. "Premium Rate Determination In The Federal Crop Insurance Program: What Do Averages Have To Say About Risk?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(02), December.
    9. Nimon, R. Wesley & Mishra, Ashok K., 2001. "Revenue Insurance and Chemical Input Use Rates," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20669, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Braun, Alexander & Schmeiser, Hato & Schreiber, Florian, 2016. "On consumer preferences and the willingness to pay for term life insurance," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 253(3), pages 761-776.
    2. Liu, Xianglin & Tang, Yingmei & Miranda, Mario J., 2015. "Does Past Experience in Natural Disasters Affect Willingness-to-Pay for Weather Index Insurance? Evidence from China," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205374, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Turvey, Calum G. & Kong, Rong & Belltawn, Burgen, 2009. "Weather Risk and the Viability of Weather Insurance In Western China," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49362, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Buchholz, Matthias & Musshoff, Oliver, 2014. "The role of weather derivatives and portfolio effects in agricultural water management," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, pages 34-44.
    5. Gülpınar, Nalân & Çanakoḡlu, Ethem, 2017. "Robust portfolio selection problem under temperature uncertainty," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 256(2), pages 500-523.
    6. Rong Kong, 2011. "Factors influencing Shaanxi and Gansu farmers' willingness to purchase weather insurance," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(4), pages 423-440, November.

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