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Competitive Strength of Nations: Doing Business in a Global Market

Author

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  • Nisar Ahmad

    () (Imperial College of Business Studies, Pakistan)

Abstract

This paper is designed to study strength and capability of nations to do business under a competitive system devised and monitored by the World Trade Organization. The main objective in this attempt is to review and evaluate the impact of WTO’s policies on the economic welfare of the developing countries and to see how far the producers on the one side and consumers on the other side have benefitted in general. The study while reviewing historical experiences of countries under laissez-faire policies, examined the effectiveness of the negotiations carried out by the WTO for enhancing international trade. The study found that under the infant industry argument, many of the WTO member countries are still protecting their businesses and violating the laid down principles of free trade. Since the WTO is to promote international trade and watch the interest of the producers, the consumers seem to have been left unattended. As a result of which the corporate sector continues to maintain its hold in protecting their monopolies in various forms. The study strongly recommends consumer protection rather than producer protection as the fundamental goal for the WTO to keep in view in its policy prescriptions.

Suggested Citation

  • Nisar Ahmad, 2013. "Competitive Strength of Nations: Doing Business in a Global Market," Eurasian Journal of Business and Management, Eurasian Publications, vol. 1(1), pages 41-50.
  • Handle: RePEc:ejn:ejbmjr:v:1:y:2013:i:1:p:41-50
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Krueger, Anne O & Tuncer, Baran, 1982. "An Empirical Test of the Infant Industry Argument," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1142-1152, December.
    2. Baldwin, Robert E, 1969. "The Case against Infant-Industry Tariff Protection," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(3), pages 295-305, May/June.
    3. Samuel Hollander, 1977. "Ricardo and the Corn Laws: A Revision," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 9(1), pages 1-47, Spring.
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