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The Split between Political Parties on Economic Issues: A Survey of Republicans, Democrats, and Economists

Author

Listed:
  • Dan A. Fuller

    (Weber State University)

  • Richard M. Alston

    (Weber State University)

  • Michael B. Vaughan

    (Weber State University)

Abstract

The results of a survey of 2,500 national delegates to the 1992 Republican and Democratic National Conventions on thirty-nine economic propositions are reported and compared and contrasted to the views held by economists on the same or similar propositions. Substantive differences between Republicans and Democrats emerge on issues of trade, stabilization policies, and income redistribution. Of particular interest and concern to economists are those areas where there is agreement between the political delegations (e.g., the view that large deficits in the balance of trade cause adverse impacts on the economy) that are at odds with the consensus view of economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Dan A. Fuller & Richard M. Alston & Michael B. Vaughan, 1995. "The Split between Political Parties on Economic Issues: A Survey of Republicans, Democrats, and Economists," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 227-238, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:21:y:1995:i:2:p:227-238
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    File URL: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/eej/Archive/Volume21/V21N1P227_238.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tavares, Jose, 2004. "Does right or left matter? Cabinets, credibility and fiscal adjustments," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(12), pages 2447-2468, December.
    2. Daniel B. Klein & Stewart Dompe, 2007. "Reasons for Supporting the Minimum Wage: Asking Signatories of the "Raise the Minimum Wage" Statement," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 4(1), pages 125-167, January.
    3. Walstad, William B. & Rebeck, Ken, 2002. "Assessing the economic knowledge and economic opinions of adults," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 921-935.
    4. J. Brian O’Roark, 2012. "Economists in Congress: How Economic Education Motivates Votes on Free Trade in Congress," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 27(Spring 20), pages 83-101.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics; Economists; Political;

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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