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Bank Financing in China's Private Sector: The Payoffs of Political Capital

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  • Zhou, Wubiao

Abstract

Summary In Reform Era China, bank financing plays a significant role in entrepreneurial development, despite a severe information asymmetry problem and a discriminatory legal/regulatory environment. This paper offers a political explanation for how Chinese entrepreneurs obtain bank loans by arguing that entrepreneurs actively invest in political capital to overcome bank financing obstacles. Pursuing membership in the legislative or semi-legislative organs of the Chinese government is an effective strategy for private entrepreneurs to obtain political capital. Empirical analysis suggests that a legislative membership helps entrepreneurs get access to bank loans; and it may be more useful for small and medium enterprises.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhou, Wubiao, 2009. "Bank Financing in China's Private Sector: The Payoffs of Political Capital," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 787-799, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:4:p:787-799
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhou, Wubiao, 2013. "Political connections and entrepreneurial investment: Evidence from China's transition economy," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 299-315.
    2. Canfei He & Qi Guo & David Rigby, 2015. "Industry Relatedness, Agglomeration Externalities and Firm Survival in China," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1528, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Sep 2015.
    3. Ding, Mingfa, 2014. "Political Connections and Stock Liquidity: Political Network, Hierarchy and Intervention," Knut Wicksell Working Paper Series 2014/7, Lund University, Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies.
    4. Qian, Xianhang & Zhang, Guangli & Liu, Haiming, 2015. "Officials on boards and the prudential behavior of banks: Evidence from China's city commercial banks," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 84-96.
    5. Lu, Zhengfei & Zhu, Jigao & Zhang, Weining, 2012. "Bank discrimination, holding bank ownership, and economic consequences: Evidence from China," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 341-354.
    6. Cumming, Douglas & Rui, Oliver & Wu, Yiping, 2016. "Political instability, access to private debt, and innovation investment in China," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 68-81.
    7. Sun, Pei & Xu, Haoping & Zhou, Jian, 2011. "The value of local political capital in transition China," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 110(3), pages 189-192, March.
    8. Kusnadi, Yuanto & Yang, Zhifeng & Zhou, Yuxiao, 2015. "Institutional development, state ownership, and corporate cash holdings: Evidence from China," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 351-359.
    9. repec:eee:jbvent:v:32:y:2017:i:4:p:405-419 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Li Tang & Michael Murphree & Dan Breznitz, 2016. "Structured uncertainty: a pilot study on innovation in China’s mobile phone handset industry," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(5), pages 1168-1194, October.
    11. Hasan, Iftekhar & Jackowicz, Krzysztof & Kowalewski, Oskar & Kozlowski, Lukasz, 2013. "Politically Connected Firms in Poland and Their Access to Bank Financing," Working Papers 13-37, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
    12. Wenli Cheng & Yongzheng Wu, 2016. "Basis for Bank Credit Allocation in China’s Private Sector: Political Connection or Firm Performance?," Monash Economics Working Papers 41-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    13. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-120 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Zhao, Hongxin & Lu, Jiangyong, 2016. "Contingent value of political capital in bank loan acquisition: Evidence from founder-controlled private enterprises in China," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 153-174.
    15. Zhou, Wubiao, 2017. "Institutional environment, public-private hybrid forms, and entrepreneurial reinvestment in a transition economy," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 197-214.
    16. Wenli Cheng & Yongzeng Wu, 2016. "Bank Finance for Private Firms in China: Does Political Capital Still Pay Off?," Monash Economics Working Papers 07-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    17. Shen, Xiaoxiao & Tsai, Kellee S., 2016. "Institutional Adaptability in China: Local Developmental Models Under Changing Economic Conditions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 107-127.
    18. Yongqiang Gao & Ya Lisa Lin & Haibin Yang, 2017. "What’s the value in it? Corporate giving under uncertainty," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 215-240, March.
    19. Du, Jun & Liu, Xiaoxuan & Zhou, Ying, 2014. "State advances and private retreats? — Evidence of aggregate productivity decomposition in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 459-474.
    20. Wubiao Zhou, 2014. "Regional institutional development, political connections, and entrepreneurial performance in China’s transition economy," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 161-181, June.
    21. Yao, Yang & Yueh, Linda, 2009. "Law, Finance, and Economic Growth in China: An Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 753-762, April.
    22. Lashitew, Addisu A., 2011. "Does Access to Finance Lower Firms’ Cost of Capital? Empirical Evidence from International Manufacturing Data," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-120, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.

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