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Ancillary Benefits of Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Transitional Economies

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  • Dudek, Dan
  • Golub, Alexander
  • Strukova, Elena

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  • Dudek, Dan & Golub, Alexander & Strukova, Elena, 2003. "Ancillary Benefits of Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Transitional Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1759-1769, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:31:y:2003:i:10:p:1759-1769
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Larson, Bruce A. & Avaliani, Simon & Golub, Alexander & Rosen, Sydney & Shaposhnikov, Dmitry & Strukova, Elena & Vincent, Jeffrey R. & Wolff, Scott K., 1999. "The Economics of Air Pollution Health Risks in Russia: A Case Study of Volgograd," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(10), pages 1803-1819, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Milan Ščasný & Emanuele Massetti & Jan Melichar & Samuel Carrara, 2015. "Quantifying the Ancillary Benefits of the Representative Concentration Pathways on Air Quality in Europe," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(2), pages 383-415, October.
    2. Thomas Bassetti & Nikos Benos & Stelios Karagiannis, 2013. "CO 2 Emissions and Income Dynamics: What Does the Global Evidence Tell Us?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(1), pages 101-125, January.
    3. Soytas, Ugur & Sari, Ramazan, 2009. "Energy consumption, economic growth, and carbon emissions: Challenges faced by an EU candidate member," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(6), pages 1667-1675, April.
    4. Larson, Donald F. & Ambrosi, Philippe & Dinar, Ariel & Rahman, Shaikh Mahfuzur & Entler, Rebecca, 2008. "Carbon markets, institutions, policies, and research," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4761, The World Bank.
    5. Stephen P. Holland, 2010. "Spillovers from Climate Policy," NBER Working Papers 16158, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Muhammad Tariq Mahmood & Sadaf Shahab, 2014. "Energy, Emissions and the Economy: Empirical Analysis from Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(4), pages 383-401.
    7. Kiula, Olga & Markandya, Anil & Ščasný, Milan & Menkyna Tsuchimoto, Fusako, 2014. "The Economic and Environmental Effects of Taxing Air Pollutants and CO2: Lessons from a Study of the Czech Republic," MPRA Paper 66599, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Oct 2015.

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