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Modeling household activity travel behavior: Examples of state of the art modeling approaches and research agenda

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  • Timmermans, Harry J.P.
  • Zhang, Junyi

Abstract

Even though the importance of representing group decision-making mechanisms of household behavior has been recognized since the 1980s in the context of the activity-based approach, studies about group behavior in transportation are relatively new and consequently limited, compared with the research about individual decisions. In line with the special issue "Modeling Intra-Household Interactions and Group Decision-Making" published in the Journal of Transportation in 2005, and motivated by the recent progress of group behavior research in transportation, this special issue presents examples of state-of-the-art modeling approaches to household activity travel decisions. We hope it will stimulate more intensive discussion about future research directions from both methodological and practical perspectives. Five papers are selected to cover diverse methodologies, including group decision theory, utility theory, latent class modeling, rule-based modeling, and micro-simulation approaches. The topics cover household task and time allocation, car ownership, vehicle transaction, mode choice, activity generation, and activity scheduling behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Timmermans, Harry J.P. & Zhang, Junyi, 2009. "Modeling household activity travel behavior: Examples of state of the art modeling approaches and research agenda," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 187-190, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transb:v:43:y:2009:i:2:p:187-190
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chandra Bhat & Ram Pendyala, 2005. "Modeling intra-household interactions and group decision-making," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(5), pages 443-448, September.
    2. Zhang, Junyi & Fujiwara, Akimasa, 2006. "Representing household time allocation behavior by endogenously incorporating diverse intra-household interactions: A case study in the context of elderly couples," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 54-74, January.
    3. Roorda, Matthew J. & Carrasco, Juan A. & Miller, Eric J., 2009. "An integrated model of vehicle transactions, activity scheduling and mode choice," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 217-229, February.
    4. Zhang, Junyi & Kuwano, Masashi & Lee, Backjin & Fujiwara, Akimasa, 2009. "Modeling household discrete choice behavior incorporating heterogeneous group decision-making mechanisms," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 230-250, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ermagun, Alireza & Levinson, David, 2016. "Intra-household bargaining for school trip accompaniment of children: A group decision approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 222-234.
    2. David A. Hensher & Chinh Ho & Matthew J. Beck, 2017. "A simplified and practical alternative way to recognise the role of household characteristics in determining an individual’s preferences: the case of automobile choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 225-240, January.
    3. André de Palma & Nathalie Picard & Ignacio Inoa, 2014. "Discrete choice decision-making with multiple decision-makers within the household," Chapters,in: Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 16, pages 363-382 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Walker, Joan L. & Ehlers, Emily & Banerjee, Ipsita & Dugundji, Elenna R., 2011. "Correcting for endogeneity in behavioral choice models with social influence variables," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 362-374, May.
    5. Nathalie Picard & André De Palma & Ignacio Inoa, 2014. "Intra-household Decision Models of Residential and Job Location," Working Papers hal-00964351, HAL.
    6. Ho, Chinh & Mulley, Corinne, 2015. "Intra-household Interactions in tour-based mode choice: The role of social, temporal, spatial and resource constraints," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 52-63.
    7. Chandra Bhat & Konstadinos Goulias & Ram Pendyala & Rajesh Paleti & Raghuprasad Sidharthan & Laura Schmitt & Hsi-Hwa Hu, 2013. "A household-level activity pattern generation model with an application for Southern California," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(5), pages 1063-1086, September.
    8. Kroesen, Maarten, 2015. "Do partners influence each other’s travel patterns? A new approach to study the role of social norms," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 489-505.
    9. Martina Menon & Federico Perali & Marcella Veronesi, 2014. "Recovering Individual Preferences for Non-Market Goods: A Collective Travel-Cost Model," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(2), pages 438-457.
    10. Nathalie Picard & Andre de Palma & Sophie Dantan, 2013. "Intra-Household Discrete Choice Models Of Mode Choice And Residential Location," Articles, International Journal of Transport Economics, vol. 40(3).
    11. Ronald, Nicole & Arentze, Theo & Timmermans, Harry, 2012. "Modeling social interactions between individuals for joint activity scheduling," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 276-290.
    12. Jara-Díaz, Sergio & Rosales-Salas, Jorge, 2017. "Beyond transport time: A review of time use modeling," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 209-230.
    13. Bert van Wee & Caspar Chorus & Karst T. Geurs, 2012. "ICT and accessibility: research synthesis and future perspectives," Chapters,in: Accessibility Analysis and Transport Planning, chapter 3, pages 37-53 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Nathalie Picard & Sophie Dantan & André de Palma, 2015. "Modelling mode choice within couples," THEMA Working Papers 2015-17, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    15. Ferdous, Nazneen & Eluru, Naveen & Bhat, Chandra R. & Meloni, Italo, 2010. "A multivariate ordered-response model system for adults' weekday activity episode generation by activity purpose and social context," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 44(8-9), pages 922-943, September.
    16. Ma, Xiaosu & Lo, Hong K., 2012. "Modeling transport management and land use over time," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 687-709.
    17. Surabhi Gupta & Peter Vovsha, 2013. "A model for work activity schedules with synchronization for multiple-worker households," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 827-845, July.
    18. Yoram Shiftan & Moshe Ben-Akiva, 2011. "A practical policy-sensitive, activity-based, travel-demand model," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 47(3), pages 517-541, December.
    19. Yoon, Seo Youn & Ravulaparthy, Srinath K. & Goulias, Konstadinos G., 2014. "Dynamic diurnal social taxonomy of urban environments using data from a geocoded time use activity-travel diary and point-based business establishment inventory," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 3-17.
    20. repec:eee:transb:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:667-685 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Querini, Florent & Benetto, Enrico, 2014. "Agent-based modelling for assessing hybrid and electric cars deployment policies in Luxembourg and Lorraine," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 149-161.
    22. Frank Goetzke & Regine Gerike & Antonio Páez & Elenna Dugundji, 2015. "Social interactions in transportation: analyzing groups and spatial networks," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(5), pages 723-731, September.
    23. Maat, Kees & Timmermans, Harry J.P., 2009. "Influence of the residential and work environment on car use in dual-earner households," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 654-664, August.
    24. Liu, Siyuan & Qu, Qiang, 2016. "Dynamic collective routing using crowdsourcing data," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 93(PA), pages 450-469.

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