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Jobs–housing imbalance, spatial correlation, and excess commuting

  • Suzuki, Tsutomu
  • Lee, Sohee
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    In this paper, we use continuous urban structure instead of zonal model, try to calculate unbiased excess commuting with joint distribution of homes and workplaces developed by Vaughan (1974), and describe the relationship between urban structure and commuting distance explicitly and theoretically for generalized home–workplace assignment pattern. We simplify the quadrivariate distribution model to a model with three important parameters: the spread of homes, the spread of workplaces, and the spatial correlation of homes and workplaces. Then we show that excess commuting and capacity utilization are expressed by the imbalance and the spatial correlation of jobs–housing structure in a theoretical context, moreover it explicitly evaluates targeting US and Japanese/Korean cities.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965856411001583
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

    Volume (Year): 46 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 322-336

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:322-336
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    1. Hamilton, Bruce W, 1982. "Wasteful Commuting," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 1035-51, October.
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    11. Mark W Horner, 2010. "Exploring the sensitivity of jobs – housing statistics to imperfect travel time information," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 37(2), pages 367-375, March.
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    15. Frost, Martin & Linneker, Brian & Spence, Nigel, 1998. "Excess or wasteful commuting in a selection of British cities," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 529-538, September.
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    17. White, Michelle J, 1988. "Urban Commuting Journeys Are Not "Wasteful."," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(5), pages 1097-110, October.
    18. Morton E O’Kelly & Wook Lee, 2005. "Disaggregate journey-to-work data: implications for excess commuting and jobs – housing balance," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 37(12), pages 2233-2252, December.
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