IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v42y2008i5p833-841.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Poverty, policy, and public transportation

Author

Listed:
  • Sanchez, Thomas W.

Abstract

By all appearances, the circumstances surrounding employment and income distribution in the United States have remained notably the same over the past 30-40 years. At the same time, policies for improving the conditions of low-income persons have remained relatively unchanged. Relevant published accounts continue to cite poorly integrated residential and employment location patterns and poor public transportation service as critical obstacles to improving the economic and social conditions of low-income persons. The relationship between poverty and public transportation was researched extensively during the late 1960s and the early 1970s; however, little recognition has been given to these efforts by more recent research efforts. To learn from the past we should review public transportation policies from 1960 to 2000 to highlight federal policies that affected urban areas during this time period, especially in relation to low-income transportation mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanchez, Thomas W., 2008. "Poverty, policy, and public transportation," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 833-841, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:42:y:2008:i:5:p:833-841
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965-8564(08)00035-9
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Martens, Karel & Golub, Aaron & Robinson, Glenn, 2012. "A justice-theoretic approach to the distribution of transportation benefits: Implications for transportation planning practice in the United States," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 684-695.
    2. Tilahun, Nebiyou & Fan, Yingling, 2014. "Transit and job accessibility: an empirical study of access to competitive clusters and regional growth strategies for enhancing transit accessibility," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 17-25.
    3. Aguiléra, Anne & Wenglenski, Sandrine & Proulhac, Laurent, 2009. "Employment suburbanisation, reverse commuting and travel behaviour by residents of the central city in the Paris metropolitan area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 685-691, August.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:137:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1616-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Ari Tarigan & Stian Bayer & Christin Berg, 2011. "Suburbanisation of employment means less sustainable travel? - The effects of policy location on commuters' travel patterns in the Stavanger region, Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1648, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Fan, Yingling & Guthrie, Andrew E & Levinson, David M, 2012. "Impact of light rail implementation on labor market accessibility: A transportation equity perspective," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 5(3), pages 28-39.
    7. Shay, Elizabeth & Combs, Tabitha S. & Findley, Daniel & Kolosna, Carl & Madeley, Michelle & Salvesen, David, 2016. "Identifying transportation disadvantage: Mixed-methods analysis combining GIS mapping with qualitative data," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 129-138.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:42:y:2008:i:5:p:833-841. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.