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Global political economy of technology standardization: A case of the Korean mobile telecommunications market

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  • Jho, Whasun

Abstract

This paper examines empirical cases of standardization in the Korean mobile market as vehicles for approaching the broader political and institutional context of standardization in telecommunications. A consideration of Korean standardization in the mobile telecommunications market is particularly interesting because it reveals how the state's political interests influence standards decisions, which are primarily driven by market and technological changes in telecommunications. Judged from the social construction of technology perspective which sheds light not only on technology itself but also on political, social and economic interests that surround transformations in technology, this paper highlights power relations among the major actors that have made technology standards decisions in Korea regarding second (2G) and third-generation (3G) mobile telephony. The paper also attempts to show how the Korean government has dealt with the diverse interests of various market actors while pursuing its own policy agenda.

Suggested Citation

  • Jho, Whasun, 2007. "Global political economy of technology standardization: A case of the Korean mobile telecommunications market," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 124-138, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:telpol:v:31:y:2007:i:2:p:124-138
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    Cited by:

    1. Gao, Xudong & Liu, Jianxin, 2012. "Catching up through the development of technology standard: The case of TD-SCDMA in China," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, pages 531-545.
    2. Bruno Basalisco & Andy Reid & Paul Richards, 2010. "Interdependent Innovation in Telecommunications: Risk, Standardization and Regulation," Chapters,in: Regulation and the Evolution of the Global Telecommunications Industry, chapter 13 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. repec:eee:tefoso:v:123:y:2017:i:c:p:57-67 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Whang, Yun-kyung & Hobday, Michael, 2011. "Local 'Test Bed' Market Demand in the Transition to Leadership: The Case of the Korean Mobile Handset Industry," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1358-1371, August.
    5. Giachetti, Claudio & Marchi, Gianluca, 2017. "Successive changes in leadership in the worldwide mobile phone industry: The role of windows of opportunity and firms’ competitive action," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 352-364.
    6. G. Kaa & M. J. Greeven, 2017. "Mobile telecommunication standardization in Japan, China, the United States, and Europe: a comparison of regulatory and industrial regimes," Telecommunication Systems: Modelling, Analysis, Design and Management, Springer, vol. 65(1), pages 181-192, May.
    7. Hong Jiang & Shukuan Zhao & Zhi Li & Yong Chen, 2016. "Interaction between technology standardization and technology development: a coupling effect study," Information Technology and Management, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 229-243, September.
    8. G. Kaa & M. J. Greeven, 0. "Mobile telecommunication standardization in Japan, China, the United States, and Europe: a comparison of regulatory and industrial regimes," Telecommunication Systems: Modelling, Analysis, Design and Management, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-12.
    9. Vialle, Pierre & Song, Junjie & Zhang, Jian, 2012. "Competing with dominant global standards in a catching-up context. The case of mobile standards in China," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, pages 832-846.

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