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Public preferences over efficiency, equity and autonomy in vaccination policy: An empirical study

Author

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  • Luyten, Jeroen
  • Dorgali, Veronica
  • Hens, Niel
  • Beutels, Philippe

Abstract

Vaccination programs increasingly have to comply with standards of evidence-based decision making. However, such a framework tends to ignore social and ethical sensitivities, risking policy choices that lack crucial public support. Research is needed under which circumstances and to which extent equity and autonomy should prevail over effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in matters of infectious disease prevention. We report on a study investigating public preferences over various vaccination policy options, based on a population survey held in Flanders, Belgium (N = 1049) between March and July 2011. We found (1) that public support varied considerably between policies that were equally efficient in preventing disease but differed according to target group or incentives to improve uptake and (2) that preferences over the use of legal compulsion, financial accountability or the offering of rewards appear to be driven by individuals' social orientation.

Suggested Citation

  • Luyten, Jeroen & Dorgali, Veronica & Hens, Niel & Beutels, Philippe, 2013. "Public preferences over efficiency, equity and autonomy in vaccination policy: An empirical study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 84-89.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:77:y:2013:i:c:p:84-89 DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.11.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ham, Chris, 1997. "Priority setting in health care: learning from international experience," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 49-66, October.
    2. Blume, Stuart & Zanders, Mariska, 2006. "Vaccine independence, local competences and globalisation: Lessons from the history of pertussis vaccines," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 1825-1835, October.
    3. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2008.136440_6 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dobrow, Mark J. & Goel, Vivek & Upshur, R. E. G., 2004. "Evidence-based health policy: context and utilisation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 207-217, January.
    5. Streefland, Pieter & Chowdhury, A. M. R. & Ramos-Jimenez, Pilar, 1999. "Patterns of vaccination acceptance," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(12), pages 1705-1716, December.
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