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Unemployment and psychosocial adjustment in young adults: causation or selection?

Author

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  • Fergusson, David M.
  • John Horwood, L.
  • Woodward, Lianne J.

Abstract

This study investigates the relationships between unemployment following school leaving and psychosocial adjustment problems (mental health, substance use, crime, suicidal behaviours and teenage pregnancy) in a birth cohort of over 1000 New Zealand born young people. The data were gathered during the course of the Christchurch Health and Development Study (CHDS). The CHDS is a longitudinal study of a birth cohort of 1265 children born in the Christchurch (NZ) urban region who have been studied from birth to age 21. Data were gathered by personal interview on: (a) exposure to unemployment and (b) personal adjustment over the period from age 16 to age 21. Measures of personal adjustment included mental health (depression, anxiety), substance use, crime, suicidal behaviours and (for females) teenage pregnancy. Data were analysed using a fixed effects regression model that took into account both observed and non-observed sources of confounding and the possibility of reverse causal associations between personal adjustment and unemployment. Before adjustment for confounding and reverse causality there were significant (p

Suggested Citation

  • Fergusson, David M. & John Horwood, L. & Woodward, Lianne J., 2001. "Unemployment and psychosocial adjustment in young adults: causation or selection?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 305-320, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:53:y:2001:i:3:p:305-320
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Torbjørn Skardhamar & Kjetil Telle, 2009. "Life after prison The relationship between employment and re-incarceration," Discussion Papers 597, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Lee, Jungeun Olivia & Hill, Karl G. & Hartigan, Lacey A. & Boden, Joseph M. & Guttmannova, Katarina & Kosterman, Rick & Bailey, Jennifer A. & Catalano, Richard F., 2015. "Unemployment and substance use problems among young adults: Does childhood low socioeconomic status exacerbate the effect?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 36-44.
    3. Giatti, Luana & Barreto, Sandhi M. & César, Cibele C., 2010. "Unemployment and self-rated health: Neighborhood influence," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(4), pages 815-823, August.
    4. Grant Johnston, 2004. "Healthy, wealthy and wise? A review of the wider benefits of education," Treasury Working Paper Series 04/04, New Zealand Treasury.
    5. Joaquina Palomar-Lever & Amparo Victorio-Estrada, 2014. "Determinants of Subjective Well-Being in Adolescent Children of Recipients of the Oportunidades Human Development Program in Mexico," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(1), pages 103-124, August.
    6. Reeves, Aaron & McKee, Martin & Basu, Sanjay & Stuckler, David, 2014. "The political economy of austerity and healthcare: Cross-national analysis of expenditure changes in 27 European nations 1995–2011," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 1-8.
    7. Lundin, Andreas & Hemmingsson, Tomas, 2013. "Adolescent predictors of unemployment and disability pension across the life course – a longitudinal study of selection in 49 321 Swedish men," Working Paper Series 2013:25, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    8. Martyna Kobus & Marcin Jakubek, 2015. "Youth unemployment and mental health: dominance approach. Evidence from Poland," IBS Working Papers 4/2015, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    9. Gail Pacheco & Jessica Dye, 2013. "Estimating the Cost of Youth Disengagement in New Zealand," Working Papers 2013-04, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.

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