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Rethinking the public sector: idiosyncrasies of biotechnology commercialization as motors of national R&D reform in Germany and Japan

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  • Lehrer, Mark
  • Asakawa, Kazuhiro

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  • Lehrer, Mark & Asakawa, Kazuhiro, 2004. "Rethinking the public sector: idiosyncrasies of biotechnology commercialization as motors of national R&D reform in Germany and Japan," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6-7), pages 921-938, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:33:y:2004:i:6-7:p:921-938
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven Casper & Mark Lehrer & David Soskice, 1999. "Can High-technology Industries Prosper in Germany? Institutional Frameworks and the Evolution of the German Software and Biotechnology Industries," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 5-24.
    2. Pisano, Gary P., 1996. "Learning-before-doing in the development of new process technology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7), pages 1097-1119, October.
    3. Michael E. Porter, 1992. "Capital Choices: Changing The Way America Invests In Industry," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 5(2), pages 4-16.
    4. Lazonick, William & O'Sullivan, Mary, 1996. "Organization, Finance and International Competition," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 1-49.
    5. Wilson, David & Souitaris, Vangelis, 2002. "Do Germany's federal and land governments (still) co-ordinate their innovation policies?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1123-1140, September.
    6. Pavitt, K, 2001. "Public Policies to Support Basic Research: What Can the Rest of the World Learn from US Theory and Practice? (And What They Should Not Learn)," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 761-779, September.
    7. Murray, Fiona, 2002. "Innovation as co-evolution of scientific and technological networks: exploring tissue engineering," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(8-9), pages 1389-1403, December.
    8. L. G. Thomas, III, 2001. "The Japanese Pharmaceutical Industry," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2288.
    9. Whitley, Richard, 2003. "Competition and pluralism in the public sciences: the impact of institutional frameworks on the organisation of academic science," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1015-1029, June.
    10. McMillan, G. Steven & Narin, Francis & Deeds, David L., 2000. "An analysis of the critical role of public science in innovation: the case of biotechnology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-8, January.
    11. Malerba, Franco & Orsenigo, Luigi, 1997. "Technological Regimes and Sectoral Patterns of Innovative Activities," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 83-117.
    12. Steven Casper & Hannah Kettler, 2001. "National Institutional Frameworks And The Hybridization Of Entrepreneurial Business Models: The German And Uk Biotechnology Sectors," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 5-30.
    13. Swann, Peter & Prevezer, Martha, 1996. "A comparison of the dynamics of industrial clustering in computing and biotechnology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7), pages 1139-1157, October.
    14. Dohse, Dirk, 2000. "Technology policy and the regions -- the case of the BioRegio contest," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1111-1133, December.
    15. Kneller, Robert, 2003. "Autarkic drug discovery in Japanese pharmaceutical companies: insights into national differences in industrial innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 1805-1827, December.
    16. Casper, Steven & Whitley, Richard, 2004. "Managing competences in entrepreneurial technology firms: a comparative institutional analysis of Germany, Sweden and the UK," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 89-106, January.
    17. Zucker, Lynne G & Darby, Michael R & Brewer, Marilynn B, 1998. "Intellectual Human Capital and the Birth of U.S. Biotechnology Enterprises," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 290-306, March.
    18. Richard R. Nelson, 1959. "The Simple Economics of Basic Scientific Research," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67, pages 297-297.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yusuf, Shahid & Nabeshima, Kaoru, 2005. "Japan's changing industrial landscape," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3758, The World Bank.
    2. Trippl, Michaela & Gabain, Joshua von & Tödtling, Franz, 2006. "Policy agents as catalysts of knowledge links in the biotechnology sector," SRE-Discussion Papers 1742, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    3. Tödtling, Franz & Trippl, Michaela & Gabain, Joshua von, 2006. "Clusterentwicklung und -politik im Biotechnologiesektor Wien im Kontext internationaler Erfahrungen," SRE-Discussion Papers 208, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    4. Patrizio Bianchi & Sandrine Labory, 2011. "Industrial Policy after the Crisis," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14127.
    5. Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Marlene Grande, 2013. "Determinants of the economic performance of Portuguese Academic Spin-offs: do Science & Technology infrastructures and support matter?," FEP Working Papers 502, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    6. Oyelaran-Oyeyinka, Banji & Gehl Sampath, Padmashree, 2006. "Rough Road to Market: Institutional Barriers to Innovations in Africa," MERIT Working Papers 026, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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