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The transition from payroll to consumption receipts with endogenous human capital

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  • Lord, William

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  • Lord, William, 1989. "The transition from payroll to consumption receipts with endogenous human capital," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 53-73, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:38:y:1989:i:1:p:53-73
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Slemrod, Joel & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1987. " The Optimal Size of a Tax Collection Agency," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(2), pages 183-192.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cruz Echevarria & Amaia Iza, 2000. "Income Taxation and Finite Horizons in a Human Capital Model," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 7(6), pages 665-689, December.
    2. Dos Santos Marcelo Rodrigues, 2012. "Human Capital Formation and Criminal Behavior: The Role of Early Childhood Education," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-26, September.
    3. Dabla-Norris, Era & Matoovu, John M. & Wade, Paul, 2002. "Debt Relief, Demand for Eduction, and Poverty," WIDER Working Paper Series 052, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Lewis, Kenneth A. & Seidman, Laurence S., 2001. "The Consumption Tax and Transitional Relief," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 99-120, January.
    5. Lans Bovenberg, A. & Jacobs, Bas, 2005. "Redistribution and education subsidies are Siamese twins," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 2005-2035.
    6. Alexander Ludwig & Thomas Schelkle & Edgar Vogel, 2012. "Demographic Change, Human Capital and Welfare," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(1), pages 94-107, January.
    7. Ihori, Toshihiro, 2001. "Wealth taxation and economic growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 129-148, January.
    8. Matthias Cinyabuguma & Bill Lord & Christelle Viauroux, 2012. "Revolution in U.S. Fertility, Schooling and Women's Work, 1875-1940: Assessing Proposed Explanations," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 12-04, UMBC Department of Economics, revised 30 Aug 2013.
    9. Trostel, Philip A., 1995. "The Effect of Deficit Finance on Human Capital," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 48(4), pages 531-546, December.
    10. Bovenberg, A. Lans & van Ewijk, Casper, 1997. "Progressive taxes, equity, and human capital accumulation in an endogenous growth model with overlapping generations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 153-179.
    11. Robin Boadway & David Wildasin, 1994. "Taxation and savings: a survey," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, pages 19-63.
    12. Peter Rangazas, 2002. "The Quantity and Quality of Schooling and U.S. Labor Productivity Growth (1870-2000)," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 932-964, October.
    13. Lord, William & Rangazas, Peter, 1998. "Capital Accumulation and Taxation in a General Equilibrium Model with Risky Human Capital," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 509-531, July.
    14. Mazzonna, Fabrizio, 2014. "The long-lasting effects of family background: A European cross-country comparison," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, pages 25-42.
    15. Philip Trostel & Ian Walker, 2006. "Education and Work," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 377-399.
    16. Daehaeng Kim & Chul-In Lee, 2007. "On-the-Job Human Capital Accumulation in a Real Business Cycle Model: Implications for Intertemporal Substitution Elasticity and Labor Hoarding," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 494-518, July.
    17. Dirk Schindler & Hongyan Yang, 2015. "Catalysts for social insurance: education subsidies versus physical capital taxation," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 22(2), pages 274-310, April.
    18. Trostel, Philip A., 1995. "The Effect of Deficit Finance on Human Capital," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 48(4), pages 531-46, December.

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