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Financial sophistication and the distribution of the welfare cost of inflation

  • Boel, Paola
  • Camera, Gabriele

The welfare cost of anticipated inflation is quantified in a calibrated model of the U.S. economy that exhibits tractable equilibrium dispersion in wealth and earnings. Inflation does not generate large losses in societal welfare, yet its impact varies noticeably across segments of society depending also on the financial sophistication of the economy. If money is the only asset, then inflation mostly hurts the wealthier and more productive agents, while those poorer and less productive may even benefit from inflation. The converse holds in a more sophisticated financial environment where agents can insure against consumption risk with assets other than money.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Monetary Economics.

Volume (Year): 56 (2009)
Issue (Month): 7 (October)
Pages: 968-978

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Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:56:y:2009:i:7:p:968-978
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  1. Boel, Paola & Camera, Gabriele, 2004. "Efficient Monetary Allocations and the Illiquidity of Bonds," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1171, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  2. Paola Boel & Gabriele Camera, 2009. "Financial Sophistication and the Distribution of the Welfare Cost of Inflation," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1222, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  3. S. Boragan Aruoba & Christopher J. Waller, 2005. "Money and Capital," 2005 Meeting Papers 550, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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  19. Aliprantis, C.D. & Camera, Gabriele & Puzzello, D., 2005. "Anonymous Markets and Monetary Trading," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1179, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  20. Goldfeld, Stephen M. & Sichel, Daniel E., 1990. "The demand for money," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 299-356 Elsevier.
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