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How hard is it to tell which is a Condorcet committee?

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  • Darmann, Andreas

Abstract

This paper establishes the computational complexity status for a problem of deciding on the quality of a committee. Starting with individual preferences over alternatives, we analyse when it can be determined efficiently if a given committee C satisfies a weak (resp. strong) Condorcet criterion–i.e., if C is at least as good as (resp. better than) every other committee in a pairwise majority comparison. Scoring functions used in classic voting rules are adapted for these comparisons. In particular, we draw the sharp separation line between computationally tractable and intractable instances with respect to different voting rules. Finally, we show that deciding if there exists a committee which satisfies the weak (resp. strong) Condorcet criterion is computationally hard.

Suggested Citation

  • Darmann, Andreas, 2013. "How hard is it to tell which is a Condorcet committee?," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 282-292.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:matsoc:v:66:y:2013:i:3:p:282-292
    DOI: 10.1016/j.mathsocsci.2013.06.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ariel Procaccia & Jeffrey Rosenschein & Aviv Zohar, 2008. "On the complexity of achieving proportional representation," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 30(3), pages 353-362, April.
    2. Brams, Steven J. & Fishburn, Peter C., 2002. "Voting procedures," Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare,in: K. J. Arrow & A. K. Sen & K. Suzumura (ed.), Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 173-236 Elsevier.
    3. Darmann, Andreas & Klamler, Christian & Pferschy, Ulrich, 2009. "Maximizing the minimum voter satisfaction on spanning trees," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 238-250, September.
    4. Darmann, Andreas & Klamler, Christian & Pferschy, Ulrich, 2010. "A note on maximizing the minimum voter satisfaction on spanning trees," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 82-85, July.
    5. Roberts, Fred S., 1991. "Characterizations of the plurality function," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 101-127, April.
    6. Gehrlein, William V., 1985. "The Condorcet criterion and committee selection," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 199-209, December.
    7. Klamler, Christian & Pferschy, Ulrich & Ruzika, Stefan, 2012. "Committee selection under weight constraints," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 48-56.
    8. Barış Kaymak & M. Remzi Sanver, 2003. "Sets of alternatives as Condorcet winners," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 20(3), pages 477-494, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:matsoc:v:93:y:2018:i:c:p:57-66 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:mateco:v:70:y:2017:i:c:p:36-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Kamwa, Eric, 2017. "On stable rules for selecting committees," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 36-44.
    4. Eric Kamwa & Vincent Merlin, 2018. "Coincidence of Condorcet committees," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 50(1), pages 171-189, January.

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