IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jeborg/v166y2019icp403-431.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Secondary currency acceptance: Experimental evidence with a dual currency search model

Author

Listed:
  • Rietz, Justin

Abstract

Motivated by the use of non-legal tender currencies in regions experiencing economic turmoil and by the growing use of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, I examine in a controlled, experimental laboratory setting, the acceptance of a secondary currency when a primary currency already circulates in an economy. The underlying model is an indivisible goods / indivisible money, dual currency search model similar to that in Kiyotaki and Wright (1993) and Curtis and Waller (2000). In such models, there are two pure Nash equilibria - total acceptance or total rejection of the secondary currency - and one unstable, mixed equilibrium. This mixed equilibrium is considered an artifact of the indivisibility of money and goods in the model and is often ignored. I find that when a significant friction - in this case the inability to barter - is introduced, the equilibrium tends towards complete acceptance of the secondary currency. Conversely, when barter is readily available to subjects, the equilibrium tends towards total rejection. As predicted by theory, the tendency towards one equilibrium or the other appears to be influenced by the mixed equilibrium and the related basins of attraction.

Suggested Citation

  • Rietz, Justin, 2019. "Secondary currency acceptance: Experimental evidence with a dual currency search model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 403-431.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:166:y:2019:i:c:p:403-431
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2019.07.010
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268119302306
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gabriele Camera & Charles Noussair & Steven Tucker, 2003. "Rate-of-return dominance and efficiency in an experimental economy," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 22(3), pages 629-660, October.
    2. Colacelli, Mariana & Blackburn, David J.H., 2009. "Secondary currency: An empirical analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 295-308, April.
    3. Jack Ochs & John Duffy, 1999. "Emergence of Money as a Medium of Exchange: An Experimental Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 847-877, September.
    4. Christopher J. Waller & Ben R. Craig, 2000. "Dual-currency economies as multiple-payment systems," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue qi, pages 2-13.
    5. Alberto Trejos & Randall Wright, 1996. "Search-theoretic models of international currency," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue may, pages 117-132.
    6. Miguel Molico, 2006. "The Distribution Of Money And Prices In Search Equilibrium," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(3), pages 701-722, August.
    7. Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2005. "A Unified Framework for Monetary Theory and Policy Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(3), pages 463-484, June.
    8. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Wright, Randall, 1989. "On Money as a Medium of Exchange," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 927-954, August.
    9. Randall Wright, 1999. "A note on asymmetric and mixed strategy equilibria in the search-theoretic model of fiat money," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 14(2), pages 463-471.
    10. Guillaume Rocheteau & Randall Wright, 2005. "Money in Search Equilibrium, in Competitive Equilibrium, and in Competitive Search Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(1), pages 175-202, January.
    11. Kandori, Michihiro & Mailath, George J & Rob, Rafael, 1993. "Learning, Mutation, and Long Run Equilibria in Games," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 29-56, January.
    12. Fabian Schar & Aleksander Berentsen, 2018. "A Short Introduction to the World of Cryptocurrencies," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, pages 1-16.
    13. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
    14. Soller Curtis, Elisabeth & Waller, Christopher J., 2000. "A search-theoretic model of legal and illegal currency," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 155-184, February.
    15. Shouyong Shi, 1997. "A Divisible Search Model of Fiat Money," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(1), pages 75-102, January.
    16. Trejos, Alberto & Wright, Randall, 1995. "Search, Bargaining, Money, and Prices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(1), pages 118-141, February.
    17. Randall Wright & Alberto Trejos, 1996. "Search-theoretic models of international currency," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue may, pages 117-132.
    18. Jiang, Janet Hua & Zhang, Cathy, 2018. "Competing currencies in the laboratory," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 253-280.
    19. John Duffy & Jack Ochs, 2002. "Intrinsically Worthless Objects as Media of Exchange: Experimental Evidence," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(3), pages 637-674, August.
    20. Brown, Paul M., 1996. "Experimental evidence on money as a medium of exchange," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 583-600, April.
    21. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Wright, Randall, 1993. "A Search-Theoretic Approach to Monetary Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 63-77, March.
    22. John Duffy & Daniela Puzzello, 2014. "Gift Exchange versus Monetary Exchange: Theory and Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(6), pages 1735-1776, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Aurélien Nioche & Basile Garcia & Germain Lefebvre & Thomas Boraud & Nicolas Rougier & Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde, 2019. "Coordination over a unique medium of exchange under information scarcity," Post-Print hal-02356248, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Secondary currency; Cryptocurrency; Currency shortage; Macro experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:166:y:2019:i:c:p:403-431. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.