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How social and human capital influence opportunity recognition and resource mobilization in India's handloom industry

Listed author(s):
  • Bhagavatula, Suresh
  • Elfring, Tom
  • van Tilburg, Aad
  • van de Bunt, Gerhard G.
Registered author(s):

    Small-scale firms in rural areas play an extremely important role in the development of any country, and especially in developing countries. To understand entrepreneurs who operate in a low-technology industry, we rely on the network perspective on entrepreneurship. In this paper, we investigate how the social and human capital of entrepreneurs (in this case master weavers in the handloom industry) influence their ability to recognize opportunities and mobilize resources. In addition to examining the direct effects, we also explore the possibilities of social capital mediating between human capital, on the one hand, and opportunity recognition and resource mobilization on the other. This paper adds to existing literature in two ways: firstly, we expand the social capital paradigm by including different cultural settings and links to existing studies regarding small enterprises. Secondly, we provide additional evidence to the ongoing debate as to what constitutes a 'good network'.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0883-9026(08)00109-2
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Business Venturing.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 245-260

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jbvent:v:25:y:2010:i:3:p:245-260
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbusvent

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    1. Elfring, Tom & Hulsink, Willem, 2003. "Networks in Entrepreneurship: The Case of High-Technology Firms," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 409-422, December.
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    9. Davidsson, Per & Honig, Benson, 2003. "The role of social and human capital among nascent entrepreneurs," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 301-331, May.
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    11. Kim, Phillip H. & Aldrich, Howard E., 2005. "Social Capital and Entrepreneurship," Foundations and Trends(R) in Entrepreneurship, now publishers, vol. 1(2), pages 55-104, June.
    12. Dimov, Dimo P. & Shepherd, Dean A., 2005. "Human capital theory and venture capital firms: exploring "home runs" and "strike outs"," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 1-21, January.
    13. Yu, Tony Fu-Lai, 2001. "Entrepreneurial Alertness and Discovery," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 14(1), pages 47-63, March.
    14. Honig, Benson, 1998. "What determines success? examining the human, financial, and social capital of jamaican microentrepreneurs," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 371-394, September.
    15. Cooper, Arnold C. & Folta, Timothy B. & Woo, Carolyn, 1995. "Entrepreneurial information search," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 107-120, March.
    16. Birley, Sue, 1985. "The role of networks in the entrepreneurial process," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 107-117.
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