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Adolescent's eWOM intentions: An investigation into the roles of peers, the Internet and gender

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  • Mishra, Anubhav
  • Maheswarappa, Satish S.
  • Maity, Moutusy
  • Samu, Sridhar

Abstract

Teenagers are major contributors of online content because of continuous communication and sharing with peers using social media or instant messaging apps. They like to immediately tell the world about their purchases and consumption experiences, which leads to the generation and transmission of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM). This study uses consumer socialization perspective to examine how age, peers and Internet usage influence teenagers' eWOM intentions. The findings suggest that normative and informative influence of peers and the Internet have significant positive association with eWOM. Moreover, these influences also mediate the direct influence of age and Internet usage on eWOM. Further, the potential eWOM behavior of male teenagers is influenced by the existing peer norms, whereas for females, their reliance and belief in the credibility of online information is more critical. The insights are valuable for marketers interested in the powerful and growing teenage consumer segment, especially in the new emerging markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Mishra, Anubhav & Maheswarappa, Satish S. & Maity, Moutusy & Samu, Sridhar, 2018. "Adolescent's eWOM intentions: An investigation into the roles of peers, the Internet and gender," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 394-405.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:86:y:2018:i:c:p:394-405
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2017.04.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Regina Burnasheva & Yong GuSuh & Katherine Villalobos-Moron, 2019. "Factors Affecting Millennials’ Attitudes toward Luxury Fashion Brands: A Cross-Cultural Study," International Business Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 12(6), pages 69-81, June.
    2. Philp, Matthew & Ashworth, Laurence, 2020. "I should have known better!: When firm-caused failure leads to self-image concerns and reduces negative word-of-mouth," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 283-293.
    3. Chu, Shu-Chuan & Chen, Hsuan-Ting & Gan, Chen, 2020. "Consumers’ engagement with corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication in social media: Evidence from China and the United States," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 260-271.
    4. Rodney Duffett, 2020. "The YouTube Marketing Communication Effect on Cognitive, Affective and Behavioural Attitudes among Generation Z Consumers," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(12), pages 1-25, June.
    5. Chinchanachokchai, Sydney & de Gregorio, Federico, 2020. "A consumer socialization approach to understanding advertising avoidance on social media," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 474-483.

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