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Does information drive trading in option strategies?

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  • Fahlenbrach, Rüdiger
  • Sandås, Patrik

Abstract

We study trading in option strategies in the FTSE-100 index market. Trades in option strategies represent around 37% of the total number of trades and over 75% of the total trading volume in our sample. We find some evidence that order flow in volatility-sensitive option strategies contains information about future realized volatility. We do not find evidence that order flow in directionally-sensitive option strategies contains information about future returns. Overall, our evidence suggests that option strategies are used both by traders who possess non-public information about future volatility and by uninformed speculators who appear to follow unprofitable trend chasing strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Fahlenbrach, Rüdiger & Sandås, Patrik, 2010. "Does information drive trading in option strategies?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 2370-2385, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:34:y:2010:i:10:p:2370-2385
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bauer, Rob & Cosemans, Mathijs & Eichholtz, Piet, 2009. "Option trading and individual investor performance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 731-746, April.
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    7. Chang, Chuang-Chang & Hsieh, Pei-Fang & Wang, Yaw-Huei, 2010. "Information content of options trading volume for future volatility: Evidence from the Taiwan options market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 174-183, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. D. Matsypura & V.G. Timkovsky, 2013. "Integer programs for margining option portfolios by option spreads with more than four legs," Computational Management Science, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 51-76, February.
    2. Mugwagwa, Tafadzwa & Ramiah, Vikash & Naughton, Tony & Moosa, Imad, 2012. "The efficiency of the buy-write strategy: Evidence from Australia," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 305-328.
    3. Stivers, Chris & Sun, Licheng, 2013. "Returns and option activity over the option-expiration week for S&P 100 stocks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4226-4240.
    4. Choy, Siu Kai & Wei, Jason, 2012. "Option trading: Information or differences of opinion?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2299-2322.

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