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Productivity and economic growth in East Asia: innovation, efficiency and accumulation

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  • Han, Gaofeng
  • Kalirajan, Kaliappa
  • Singh, Nirvikar

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  • Han, Gaofeng & Kalirajan, Kaliappa & Singh, Nirvikar, 2002. "Productivity and economic growth in East Asia: innovation, efficiency and accumulation," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 401-424, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:japwor:v:14:y:2002:i:4:p:401-424
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hayami, Yujiro & Ogasawara, Junichi, 1999. "Changes in the Sources of Modern Economic Growth: Japan Compared with the United States," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-21, March.
    2. Alwyn Young, 1992. "A Tale of Two Cities: Factor Accumulation and Technical Change in Hong Kong and Singapore," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1992, Volume 7, pages 13-64 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Swamy, P A V B, 1970. "Efficient Inference in a Random Coefficient Regression Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 38(2), pages 311-323, March.
    4. Young, Alwyn, 1994. "Lessons from the East Asian NICS: A contrarian view," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 964-973, April.
    5. Fischer, Stanley, 1993. "The role of macroeconomic factors in growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 485-512, December.
    6. Hughes, Helen, 1995. "Why Have East Asian Countries Led Economic Development?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 71(212), pages 88-104, March.
    7. Alwyn Young, 1995. "The Tyranny of Numbers: Confronting the Statistical Realities of the East Asian Growth Experience," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 641-680.
    8. Jesus Felipe, 1999. "Total factor productivity growth in East Asia: A critical survey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 1-41.
    9. Susan M. Collins & Barry P. Bosworth, 1996. "Economic Growth in East Asia: Accumulation versus Assimilation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 135-204.
    10. K.P. Kalirajan & M.B. Obwona & S. Zhao, 1996. "A Decomposition of Total Factor Productivity Growth: The Case of Chinese Agricultural Growth before and after Reforms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 331-338.
    11. Aigner, Dennis & Lovell, C. A. Knox & Schmidt, Peter, 1977. "Formulation and estimation of stochastic frontier production function models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 21-37, July.
    12. Kalirajan, K P & Obwona, M B, 1994. "Frontier Production Function: The Stochastic Coefficients Approach," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 56(1), pages 87-96, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Voxi Heinrich S Amavilah & Richard T. Newcomb, 2004. "Economic Growth and the Financial Economics of Capital Accumulation under Shifting Technological Change," GE, Growth, Math methods 0404001, EconWPA.
    2. Ahmed, Elsadig Musa & Krishnasamy, Geeta, 2013. "Are Asian technology gaps due to human capital quality differences?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 51-58.
    3. Chia-Hung Sun, 2005. "Productivity growth in East Asian manufacturing: a fading miracle or measurement problem?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(1), pages 1-19.
    4. Ku-Hsieh Chen & Hao-Yen Yang, 2011. "A cross-country comparison of productivity growth using the generalised metafrontier Malmquist productivity index: with application to banking industries in Taiwan and China," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 197-212, June.
    5. Minzhe Du & Bing Wang & Yanrui Wu, 2014. "Sources of China’s Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis Based on the BML Index with Green Growth Accounting," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(9), pages 1-22, September.

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