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Projected regional impacts of appliance efficiency standards for the US residential sector

Author

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  • Koomey, Jonathan G.
  • Mahler, Susan A.
  • Webber, Carrie A.
  • McMahon, James E.

Abstract

Minimum efficiency standards for residential appliances have been implemented in the US for a large number of residential end-uses. This analysis assesses the potential energy, dollar, and carbon impacts of those standards at the state and national levels. We explicitly account for improvements in efficiency likely to occur in the absence of standards, but because our method for characterizing these exogenous improvements probably overestimates them, both the energy and cost savings presented in this article represent lower bounds to the true benefits. Cumulative present-valued dollar savings after subtracting out the additional cost of the more efficient equipment are about $30 billion from 1990 to 2010. Each dollar of federal expenditure on implementing the standards will contribute $165 of net present-valued savings to the US economy over the 1990 to 2010 period. Average benefit/cost ratios for these standards are about 3.5 for the US as a whole. Projected carbon reductions are approximately 9 million metric tons of carbon per year in the years from 2000 to 2010. Because these standards save energy at a cost less than the price of that energy, the resulting carbon emission reductions are achieved at negative net cost to society.

Suggested Citation

  • Koomey, Jonathan G. & Mahler, Susan A. & Webber, Carrie A. & McMahon, James E., 1999. "Projected regional impacts of appliance efficiency standards for the US residential sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 69-84.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:24:y:1999:i:1:p:69-84
    DOI: 10.1016/S0360-5442(98)00065-6
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    Cited by:

    1. Lutsey, Nicholas & Sperling, Daniel, 2012. "Regulatory adaptation: Accommodating electric vehicles in a petroleum world," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 308-316.
    2. Georgopoulou, E. & Sarafidis, Y. & Mirasgedis, S. & Balaras, C.A. & Gaglia, A. & Lalas, D.P., 2006. "Evaluating the need for economic support policies in promoting greenhouse gas emission reduction measures in the building sector: The case of Greece," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(15), pages 2012-2031, October.
    3. Michael G. Pollitt & Irina Shaorshadze, 2013. "The role of behavioural economics in energy and climate policy," Chapters,in: Handbook on Energy and Climate Change, chapter 24, pages 523-546 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Philip B. Thompson, 2002. "Consumer Theory, Home Production, And Energy Efficiency," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(1), pages 50-59, January.
    5. Lutsey, Nicholas P., 2008. "Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt5rd41433, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    6. Pereira, Iraci Miranda & Assis, Eleonora Sad de, 2013. "Urban energy consumption mapping for energy management," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 257-269.
    7. Lokey, Elizabeth, 2007. "How the next US president should slow global warming," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5399-5402, November.
    8. Young, Denise, 2008. "When do energy-efficient appliances generate energy savings? Some evidence from Canada," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 34-46, January.
    9. Brencic, Vera & Young, Denise, 2009. "Time-saving innovations, time allocation, and energy use: Evidence from Canadian households," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(11), pages 2859-2867, September.
    10. Jiusto, Scott, 2008. "An indicator framework for assessing US state carbon emissions reduction efforts (with baseline trends from 1990 to 2001)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 2234-2252, June.
    11. Moxnes, Erling, 2004. "Estimating customer utility of energy efficiency standards for refrigerators," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 707-724, December.

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