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Estimating petroleum products demand elasticities in Nigeria: A multivariate cointegration approach


  • Iwayemi, Akin
  • Adenikinju, Adeola
  • Babatunde, M. Adetunji


This paper formulates and estimates petroleum products demand functions in Nigeria at both aggregative and product level for the period 1977 to 2006 using multivariate cointegration approach. The estimated short and long-run price and income elasticities confirm conventional wisdom that energy consumption responds positively to changes in GDP and negatively to changes in energy price. However, the price and income elasticities of demand varied according to product type. Kerosene and gasoline have relatively high short-run income and price elasticities compared to diesel. Overall, the results show petroleum products to be price and income inelastic.

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  • Iwayemi, Akin & Adenikinju, Adeola & Babatunde, M. Adetunji, 2010. "Estimating petroleum products demand elasticities in Nigeria: A multivariate cointegration approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 73-85, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:73-85

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adom, Philip Kofi & Amakye, Kwaku & Barnor, Charles & Quartey, George & Bekoe, William, 2016. "Shift in demand elasticities, road energy forecast and the persistence profile of shocks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 189-206.
    2. Mensah, Justice Tei & Marbuah, George & Amoah, Anthony, 2016. "Energy demand in Ghana: A disaggregated analysis," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 924-935.
    3. Olusegun A. Omisakin & Abimbola M. Oyinlola & Oluwatosin A. Adeniyi, 2012. "Modeling Gasoline Demand with Structural Breaks:New Evidence from Nigeria," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-9.
    4. Abila, Nelson, 2015. "Econometric estimation of the petroleum products consumption in Nigeria: Assessing the premise for biofuels adoption," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 884-892.
    5. Rentschler, Jun, 2016. "Incidence and impact: The regional variation of poverty effects due to fossil fuel subsidy reform," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 491-503.
    6. Kenneth Gillingham & David Rapson & Gernot Wagner, 2016. "The Rebound Effect and Energy Efficiency Policy," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 10(1), pages 68-88.
    7. Olusegun A. Omisakin & Oluwatosin A. Adeniyi & Abimbola M. Oyinlola, 2012. "Structural Breaks, Parameter Stability and Energy Demand Modeling in Nigeria," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 5(2), pages 129-144, August.
    8. Suleiman, Sa’ad & Muhammad, Shahbaz, 2012. "Price and Income Elasticities of Demand for Oil Products in African Member Countries of OPEC: A Cointegration Analysis," MPRA Paper 37390, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 28 Feb 2012.
    9. Bazilian, Morgan & Onyeji, Ijeoma, 2012. "Fossil fuel subsidy removal and inadequate public power supply: Implications for businesses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-5.
    10. Kouakou, Auguste K., 2011. "Economic growth and electricity consumption in Cote d'Ivoire: Evidence from time series analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3638-3644, June.
    11. Ozturk, Ilhan & Arisoy, Ibrahim, 2016. "An estimation of crude oil import demand in Turkey: Evidence from time-varying parameters approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 174-179.
    12. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana & Janda, Karel, 2012. "Demand for gasoline is more price-inelastic than commonly thought," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 201-207.
    13. Wadud, Zia, 2016. "Diesel demand in the road freight sector in the UK: Estimates for different vehicle types," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 849-857.
    14. de Freitas, Luciano Charlita & Kaneko, Shinji, 2011. "Ethanol demand under the flex-fuel technology regime in Brazil," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1146-1154.
    15. Tajudeen, Ibrahim A., 2015. "Examining the role of energy efficiency and non-economic factors in energy demand and CO2 emissions in Nigeria: Policy implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 338-350.
    16. Adewuyi, Adeolu O., 2016. "Determinants of import demand for non-renewable energy (petroleum) products: Empirical evidence from Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 73-93.
    17. Barla, Philippe & Gilbert-Gonthier, Mathieu & Kuelah, Jean-René Tagne, 2014. "The demand for road diesel in Canada," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 316-322.
    18. Adewuyi, Adeolu O. & Adeniyi, Oluwatosin, 2015. "Trade and consumption of energy varieties: Empirical analysis of selected West Africa economies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 354-366.
    19. Marbuah, George, 2014. "Understanding crude oil import demand behaviour in Ghana," MPRA Paper 60436, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Bigerna, S. & Bollino, C.A. & Micheli, S. & Polinori, P., 2017. "Revealed and stated preferences for CO2 emissions reduction: The missing link," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 68(P2), pages 1213-1221.
    21. Leng Wong, Siang & Chia, Wai-Mun & Chang, Youngho, 2013. "Energy consumption and energy R&D in OECD: Perspectives from oil prices and economic growth," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1581-1590.
    22. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-486 is not listed on IDEAS


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