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Is the exchange rate regime really irrelevant for external adjustment?


  • Ghosh, Atish R.
  • Qureshi, Mahvash S.
  • Tsangarides, Charalambos G.


We argue that evidence on whether floating exchange rates facilitate external adjustment is contradictory because existing regime classifications do not adequately capture exchange rate flexibility relevant to external adjustment. Using a trade-weighted bilateral exchange rate volatility measure, we show that exchange rate flexibility indeed matters for current account dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghosh, Atish R. & Qureshi, Mahvash S. & Tsangarides, Charalambos G., 2013. "Is the exchange rate regime really irrelevant for external adjustment?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 104-109.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:118:y:2013:i:1:p:104-109 DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2012.09.010

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2004. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 1-48.
    2. Eduardo Levy-Yeyati & Federico Sturzenegger, 2003. "To Float or to Fix: Evidence on the Impact of Exchange Rate Regimes on Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1173-1193, September.
    3. Menzie D. Chinn & Shang-Jin Wei, 2008. "A Faith-based Initiative: Does a Flexible Exchange Rate Regime Really Facilitate Current Account Adjustment?," NBER Working Papers 14420, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Sabine Herrmann, 2009. "Do We Really Know That Flexible Exchange Rates Facilitate Current Account Adjustment? Some New Empirical Evidence for CEE Countries," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 55(4), pages 295-312.
    5. repec:hrv:faseco:34721963 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Blaise Gnimassoun & Valérie Mignon, 2013. "How Macroeconomic Imbalances Interact? Evidence from a Panel VAR Analysis," Working Papers 2013-42, CEPII research center.
    2. Gnimassoun, Blaise, 2015. "The importance of the exchange rate regime in limiting current account imbalances in sub-Saharan African countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 36-74.
    3. Hamid Raza & Gylfi Zoega & Stephen Kinsella, 2017. "Capital inflows, crisis and recovery in small open economies," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1709, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
    4. Eguren Martin, Fernando, 2016. "Exchange rate regimes and current account adjustment: An empirical investigation," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 69-93.
    5. Blaise Gnimasoun & Valérie Mignon, 2013. "Current-account adjustments and exchange-rate misalignments," EconomiX Working Papers 2013-31, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    6. repec:kap:iecepo:v:14:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10368-016-0341-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Atish R. Ghosh & Mahvash S Qureshi & Charalambos G Tsangarides, 2014. "Friedman Redux; External Adjustment and Exchange Rate Flexibility," IMF Working Papers 14/146, International Monetary Fund.
    8. An, Jiyoun & Park, Bokyeong, 2016. "External adjustment and trading partners’ exchange rate regimes," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 37, pages 47-54.
    9. Gnimassoun, Blaise & Coulibaly, Issiaka, 2014. "Current account sustainability in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does the exchange rate regime matter?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 208-226.
    10. José Antonio Ocampo, 2016. "Global macroeconomic cooperation and the exchange rate system," WIDER Working Paper Series 049, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Nieminen, Mika & Heimonen, Kari & Tohmo, Timo, 2017. "Current accounts and coordination of wage bargaining," BOFIT Discussion Papers 20/2017, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    12. Nadav Ben Zeev, 2017. "Exchange Rate Regimes And Sudden Stops," Working Papers 1712, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    13. Atish R Ghosh & Jonathan D Ostry & Mahvash S Qureshi, 2015. "Exchange Rate Management and Crisis Susceptibility: A Reassessment," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(1), pages 238-276, May.
    14. Alberto Behar & Armand Fouejieu, 2016. "External Adjustment in Oil Exporters; The Role of Fiscal Policy and the Exchange Rate," IMF Working Papers 16/107, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item


    Current account dynamics; Exchange rate regime; Bilateral exchange rate volatility;

    JEL classification:

    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics


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