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A note on representativeness and household finance

Author

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  • Dierkes, Maik
  • Klos, Alexander
  • Langer, Thomas

Abstract

Previous research has shown that social households have a higher probability of owning risky assets. Using a representative sample of the German population, we demonstrate that the sociability effect is much stronger among people younger than 50.

Suggested Citation

  • Dierkes, Maik & Klos, Alexander & Langer, Thomas, 2011. "A note on representativeness and household finance," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 62-64, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:113:y:2011:i:1:p:62-64
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde & Jürgen Schupp & Gert G. Wagner, 2011. "Individual Risk Attitudes: Measurement, Determinants, And Behavioral Consequences," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 522-550, June.
    2. Harrison Hong & Jeffrey D. Kubik & Jeremy C. Stein, 2004. "Social Interaction and Stock-Market Participation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(1), pages 137-163, February.
    3. Jeffrey R. Brown & Zoran Ivkovic & Paul A. Smith & Scott Weisbenner, 2008. "Neighbors Matter: Causal Community Effects and Stock Market Participation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(3), pages 1509-1531, June.
    4. Steven D. Levitt & John A. List, 2007. "What Do Laboratory Experiments Measuring Social Preferences Reveal About the Real World?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 153-174, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Becker, Gideon, 2014. "The portfolio structure of German households: A multinomial fractional response approach with unobserved heterogeneity," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 74, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
    2. Becker, Gideon & Dimpfl, Thomas, 2014. "Labor income risk and the reluctance of fouseholds to invest in risky financial assets: A panel data analysis," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 72, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
    3. Luik, Marc-André & Berlemann, Michael, 2014. "Institutional Reform and Depositors’ Portfolio Choice: Evidence from Censored Quantile Regressions," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100291, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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