IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecolec/v20y1997i3p235-253.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The shading and distancing of commerce: When internalization is not enough

Author

Listed:
  • Princen, Thomas

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Princen, Thomas, 1997. "The shading and distancing of commerce: When internalization is not enough," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 235-253, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:20:y:1997:i:3:p:235-253
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921-8009(96)00085-7
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. A. Michael Spence, 1979. "Investment Strategy and Growth in a New Market," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 1-19, Spring.
    2. A. Michael Spence, 1977. "Entry, Capacity, Investment and Oligopolistic Pricing," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 8(2), pages 534-544, Autumn.
    3. Boyce, James K., 1994. "Inequality as a cause of environmental degradation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 169-178, December.
    4. Templet, Paul H., 1995. "Grazing the commons: an empirical analysis of externalities, subsidies and sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 141-159, February.
    5. John Browder, 1995. "Redemptive communities: Indigenous knowledge, colonist farming systems, and conservation of tropical forests," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 12(1), pages 17-30, December.
    6. Douglas Murray, 1991. "Export agriculture, ecological disruption, and social inequity: Some effect of pesticides in Southern Honduras," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 8(4), pages 19-29, September.
    7. James Boyce, 1994. "Inequality as a Cause of Environmental Degradation," Published Studies ps1, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    8. Lele, Sharachchandra M., 1991. "Sustainable development: A critical review," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 607-621, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Michael Ash & James K. Boyce & Grace Chang & Helen Scharber, 2010. "Is Environmental Justice Good for White Folks?," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2010-05, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    2. Ferng, Jiun-Jiun, 2011. "Measuring and locating footprints: A case study of Taiwan's rice and wheat consumption footprint," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 191-201.
    3. repec:eee:ecomod:v:221:y:2010:i:21:p:2615-2623 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Duchin, Faye, 2004. "The Consumer's Guide to Effective Environmental Choices: Michael Brower and Warren Leon, Three Rivers Press, 1999, ISBN: 0-609-80281-X, 304 pp," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 273-276, February.
    5. Jon Wisman, 2011. "Inequality, Social Respectability, Political Power, and Environmental Devastation," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 877-900.
    6. Sundkvist, Asa & Milestad, Rebecka & Jansson, AnnMari, 2005. "On the importance of tightening feedback loops for sustainable development of food systems," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 224-239, April.
    7. Dingyang Zhou & Hirotaka Matsuda & Yuji Hara & Kazuhiko Takeuchi, 2012. "Potential and observed food flows in a Chinese city: a case study of Tianjin," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 29(4), pages 481-492, December.
    8. Princen, Thomas, 1999. "Consumption and environment: some conceptual issues," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 347-363, December.
    9. Marina Vornovytskyy & James Boyce, 2010. "Economic Inequality and Environmental Quality: Evidence of Pollution Shifting in Russia," Working Papers wp217, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    10. Roca, Jordi, 2003. "Do individual preferences explain the Environmental Kuznets curve?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 3-10, April.
    11. Helen Scharber & Anita Dancs, 2016. "Do locavores have a dilemma? Economic discourse and the local food critique," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(1), pages 121-133, March.
    12. James Boyce, 2007. "Is Inequality Bad for the Environment?," Working Papers wp135, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    13. Kissinger, Meidad & Rees, William E., 2009. "Footprints on the prairies: Degradation and sustainability of Canadian agricultural land in a globalizing world," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(8-9), pages 2309-2315, June.
    14. Mauerhofer, Volker, 2008. "3-D Sustainability: An approach for priority setting in situation of conflicting interests towards a Sustainable Development," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 496-506, January.
    15. Wiser, Ryan H., 1998. "Green power marketing: increasing customer demand for renewable energy," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 107-119, June.
    16. Kissinger, Meidad, 2012. "International trade related food miles – The case of Canada," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 171-178.
    17. Michael Ash & James Boyce & Grace Chang & Helen Scharber, 2010. "Is Environmental Justice Good for White Folks?," Working Papers wp229, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    18. Eden, Sally & Bear, Christopher & Walker, Gordon, 2008. "The sceptical consumer? Exploring views about food assurance," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 624-630, December.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:20:y:1997:i:3:p:235-253. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.