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Agriculture-led growth: foodgrains versus export crops in Madagascar

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  • Dorosh, Paul
  • Haggblade, Steven

Abstract

This article compares the growth-generating power of alternative agricultural development strategies in Madagascar. Projections from a semi-input-output model and a recently developed social accounting matrix suggest that both paddy and export crops stimulate strong linkages with other sectors of the Malagasy economy. But since paddy output can be increased at lower cost, investment in rehabilitating small irrigated rice perimeters generates 40% to 100% more GOP than a comparable investment in coffee production. Paddy also generates greater employment and a more equitable income distribution.
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  • Dorosh, Paul & Haggblade, Steven, 1993. "Agriculture-led growth: foodgrains versus export crops in Madagascar," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 9(2), pages 165-180, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:agecon:v:9:y:1993:i:2:p:165-180
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    1. Lewis, Blane D. & Thorbecke, Erik, 1992. "District-level economic linkages in Kenya: Evidence based on a small regional social accounting matrix," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-897, June.
    2. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter, 1989. "Agricultural technology and farm-nonfarm growth linkages," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 3(4), pages 345-364, December.
    3. Barghouti,S. & Le Moigne, G., 1990. "Irrigation In Sub-Saharan Africa; The Development Of Public And Private Systems," Papers 123, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    4. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter & Brown, James, 1989. "Farm-nonfarm linkages in rural sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(8), pages 1173-1201, August.
    5. Subramanian, Shankar & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1990. "The Transmission of Production Fluctuations and Technical Change in a Village Economy: A Social Accounting Matrix Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(1), pages 131-173, October.
    6. Maxwell, Simon & Fernando, Adrian, 1989. "Cash crops in developing countries: The issues, the facts, the policies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(11), pages 1677-1708, November.
    7. C. L. G. Bell & P. B. R. Hazell, 1980. "Measuring the Indirect Effects of an Agricultural Investment Project on Its Surrounding Region," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 62(1), pages 75-86.
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    Cited by:

    1. Delgado, Christopher L. & Hopkins, Jane & Kelly , Valerie & Hazell, P. B. R. & McKenna, Anna A. & Gruhn, Peter & Hojjati, Behjat & Sil, Jayashree & Courbois, Claude, 1998. "Agricultural growth linkages in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Research reports 107, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Minot, Nicholas & Goletti, Francesco, 2000. "Rice market liberalization and poverty in Viet Nam:," Research reports 114, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Rich, Karl M. & Winter-Nelson, Alex & Nelson, Gerald C., 1997. "Political feasibility of structural adjustment in africa: an application of SAM mixed multipliers," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(12), pages 2105-2114, December.
    4. Hassan, Rashid M. & Faki, Hamid & Byerlee, D., 2000. "The trade-off between economic efficiency and food self-sufficiency in using Sudan's irrigated land resources," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 35-54, February.

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