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The impact of the national minimum wage on the pay distribution, employment and training

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  • David Metcalf

Abstract

Britain's first ever national minimum wage (NMW) came into force in April 1999 covering some 5% of workers. Between 1999 and 2002 the NMW rose in line with the growth in average earnings. But for 2003-6 the NMW will be ratcheted up relative to median pay. The evidence shows that between 1998 and 2002 the bottom decile of the pay distribution experienced above average pay rises with no spillover effects further up the distribution. There was no overall employment effect but a small negative impact in the care home sector. The NMW boosts the probability and intensity of training. Copyright 2004 Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • David Metcalf, 2004. "The impact of the national minimum wage on the pay distribution, employment and training," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(494), pages 84-86, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:114:y:2004:i:494:p:c84-c86
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    Cited by:

    1. Metcalf, David, 2007. "Why has the British national minimum wage had little or no impact on employment?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19742, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Michele Campolieti & Morley Gunderson & Byron Lee, 2014. "Minimum Wage Effects On Permanent Versus Temporary Minimum Wage Employment," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(3), pages 578-591, July.
    3. Tony Fang & Morley Gunderson, 2009. "Minimum Wage Impacts on Older Workers: Longitudinal Estimates from Canada," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(2), pages 371-387, June.
    4. Christian Pfeifer & Simon Janssen & Philip Yang & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2011. "Effects of Training on Employee Suggestions and Promotions in an Internal Labor Market," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0061, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    5. Alessandra Scalioni Brito & Miguel Foguel & Celia Kerstenetzky, 2018. "The Contribution Of Minimum Wage Valorization Policy To The Decline In Household Income Inequality In Brazil: A Decomposition Approach," Anais do XLIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 44th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 217, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    6. Dolton, Peter & Bondibene, Chiara Rosazza & Stops, Michael, 2015. "Identifying the employment effect of invoking and changing the minimum wage: A spatial analysis of the UK," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 54-76.
    7. Fei Peng & Lili Kang, 2013. "Labor Market Institutions and Skill Premiums: An Empirical Analysis on the UK, 1972-2002," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(4), pages 959-982.
    8. Lesch, Hagen, 2004. "Beschäftigungs- und verteilungspolitische Aspekte von Mindestlöhnen," IW-Trends – Vierteljahresschrift zur empirischen Wirtschaftsforschung, Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln (IW) / Cologne Institute for Economic Research, vol. 31(4), pages 41-50.
    9. Andreas Georgiadis, 2013. "Efficiency Wages and the Economic Effects of the Minimum Wage: Evidence from a Low-Wage Labour Market," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 75(6), pages 962-979, December.
    10. Andreas P. Georgiadis, 2006. "Is the Minimum Wage Efficient? Evidence of the Effects of the UK National Minimum Wage in the Residential Care Homes Sector," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 06/160, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    11. Salverda, Wiemer & Checchi, Daniele, 2014. "Labour-Market Institutions and the Dispersion of Wage Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 8220, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Pia Rattenhuber, 2014. "Building the minimum wage: the distributional impact of Germany’s first sectoral minimum wage on wages and hours across different wage bargaining regimes," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 1429-1446, June.
    13. Christian Pfeifer & Simon Janssen & Philip Yang & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2010. "Training Participation of an Aging Workforce in an Internal Labor Market," Working Paper Series in Economics 170, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    14. Georgiadis, Andreas, 2008. "Efficiency wages and the economic effects of the minimum wage: evidence from a low-wage labour market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19628, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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