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Paretian Welfare Judgements and Bergsonian Social Choice

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  • Suzumura, Kotaro

Abstract

Two distinct approaches can be identified in the new welfare economics. The school of thought based on the compensation principles attempted to see what can be said about social welfare without making interpersonal comparisons of well-being by extending the applicability of the Pareto principle through hypothetical compensatory payments between gainers and losers. The Bergson-Samuelson school of thought introduced the social welfare function as a formal method of introducing a Pareto-inclusive ethical belief on social welfare, whose policy implications the authors should theoretically explore. Synthesizing these two approaches, this paper identifies a condition under which the new welfare economics is logically impeccable.

Suggested Citation

  • Suzumura, Kotaro, 1999. "Paretian Welfare Judgements and Bergsonian Social Choice," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(455), pages 204-220, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:109:y:1999:i:455:p:204-20
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    Cited by:

    1. Athanasios Andrikopoulos, 2007. "A representation of consistent binary relations," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 299-307, December.
    2. Gowdy, John, 2005. "Toward a new welfare economics for sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 211-222, April.
    3. Suzumura, Kotaro & Xu, Yongsheng, 2003. "On constrained dual recoverability theorems," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 143-154, April.
    4. Marc Fleurbaey & Philippe Mongin, 2005. "The news of the death of welfare economics is greatly exaggerated," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 25(2), pages 381-418, December.
    5. John Gowdy, 2006. "Evolutionary Theory and Economic Policy with Reference to Sustainability," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 1-19, April.
    6. Lahiri, Somdeb, 2009. "Acyclic social welfare," MPRA Paper 13687, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 03 Mar 2009.
    7. Gowdy, John & Seidl, Irmi, 2004. "Economic man and selfish genes: the implications of group selection for economic valuation and policy," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 343-358, July.
    8. Athanasios Andrikopoulos, 2011. "Characterization of the existence of semicontinuous weak utilities for binary relations," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 70(1), pages 13-26, January.
    9. Kotaro Suzumura, 2002. "Introduction to social choice and welfare," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 442, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    10. repec:eee:ecoser:v:3:y:2013:i:c:p:e1-e10 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B21 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Microeconomics
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations

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