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Regarding the unemployment gap by race and gender in the United States

  • Herve Queneau

    ()

    (Brooklyn College of the City University of New York)

  • Amit Sen

    ()

    (Xavier University)

Registered author(s):

    We examine the level of persistence in the unemployment gap across both race and gender in the United States. The empirical evidence suggests that all unemployment gaps exhibit low levels of persistence. While the gender unemployment gap has disappeared and stabilized in the post–1980 period, there continues to be a substantial gap between the unemployment rates of blacks and whites.

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2009/Volume29/EB-09-V29-I4-P29.pdf
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    Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 2749-2757

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    Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00499
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    1. Bradley Ewing & William Levernier & Farooq Malik, 2005. "Modeling Unemployment Rates by Race and Gender: A Nonlinear Time Series Approach," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 31(3), pages 333-347, Summer.
    2. Banerjee, Anindya & Lumsdaine, Robin L & Stock, James H, 1992. "Recursive and Sequential Tests of the Unit-Root and Trend-Break Hypotheses: Theory and International Evidence," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(3), pages 271-87, July.
    3. Flanagan, Robert J, 1976. "On the Stability of the Racial Unemployment Differential," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 302-08, May.
    4. Perron, P., 1990. "Further Evidence On Breaking Trend Functions In Macroeconomics Variables," Papers 350, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
    5. Vogelsang, T.I. & Perron, P., 1991. "Nonstationary and Level Shifts With An Application To Purchasing Power Parity," Papers 359, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
    6. Larry DeBoer & Michael C. Seeborg, 1989. "The Unemployment Rates of Men and Women: A Transition Probability Analysis," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(3), pages 404-414, April.
    7. Robert W. Fairlie & William A. Sundstrom, 1999. "The Emergence, Persistence, and Recent Widening of the Racial Unemployment Gap," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(2), pages 252-270, January.
    8. Bradley T. Ewing & William Levernier & Farooq Malik, 2002. "The Differential Effects of Output Shocks on Unemployment Rates by Race and Gender," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(3), pages 584-599, January.
    9. Leslie S. Stratton, 1993. "Racial Differences in Men's Unemployment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(3), pages 451-463, April.
    10. Andrews, Donald W K, 1993. "Exactly Median-Unbiased Estimation of First Order Autoregressive/Unit Root Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 139-65, January.
    11. Johnson, Janet L, 1983. "Sex Differentials in Unemployment Rates: A Case for No Concern," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 293-303, April.
    12. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:5:y:2007:i:23:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Abowd, John M & Killingsworth, Mark R, 1984. "Do Minority-White Unemployment Differences Really Exist?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 2(1), pages 64-72, January.
    14. Augustin Fosu, 2000. "Racial and gender differences in unemployment patterns in an urban labor market: The case of detroit," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 27(3), pages 35-47, March.
    15. Madeline Zavodny & Tao Zha, 2000. "Monetary policy and racial unemployment rates," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q4, pages 1-16.
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