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Impact of foreign direct investment volatility on economic growth of asean-5 countries

Author

Listed:
  • Chee-keong Choong

    () (Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Finance, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman)

  • Venus khim-sen Liew

    () (Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak,)

Abstract

This study examines the impact of volatility of FDI, rather than its level on the economic growth of ASEAN-5 countries. Using bounds testing approach, we show that FDI volatility retards long-run economic growth in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Our results suggest that the economic growth of Indonesia is the most susceptible to the adverse effect of FDI volatility. These findings, which are robust to different measures of FDI volatility, are of concern in dealing with the economic growth of developing countries in the ASEAN region, which rely heavily on FDI.

Suggested Citation

  • Chee-keong Choong & Venus khim-sen Liew, 2009. "Impact of foreign direct investment volatility on economic growth of asean-5 countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(3), pages 1829-1841.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00137
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2009/Volume29/EB-09-V29-I3-P31.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Robert Lensink & Oliver Morrissey, 2006. "Foreign Direct Investment: Flows, Volatility, and the Impact on Growth," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(3), pages 478-493, August.
    4. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2005. "The saving and investment nexus for China: evidence from cointegration tests," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 1979-1990.
    5. Luiz de Mello, 1997. "Foreign direct investment in developing countries and growth: A selective survey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 1-34.
    6. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    7. Engle, Robert F & Ito, Takatoshi & Lin, Wen-Ling, 1990. "Meteor Showers or Heat Waves? Heteroskedastic Intra-daily Volatility in the Foreign Exchange Market," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(3), pages 525-542, May.
    8. Ozturk, I., 2007. "Foreign Direct Investment – Growht Nexus: A Review of The Recent Literature," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 4(2), pages 79-98.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mohammad Mafizur Rahman, 2012. "The Dynamic of Financial Development, Imports, Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth: Cointegration and Causality Analysis in Pakistan," Global Business Review, International Management Institute, vol. 13(2), pages 201-219, June.
    2. Kamel ABDELLAH ( GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113 & ISG, UNIVERSITE DE TUNIS) & Dalila NICET-CHENAF (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113) & Eric ROUGIER (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113), 2012. "FDI and macroeconomic volatility: A close-up on the source countries," Cahiers du GREThA 2012-21, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    3. Dalila NICET-CHENAF & Eric ROUGIER, 2014. "Output Volatility And Fdi To Middle East And North African Countries: A Close-Up On The Source Countries," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 40, pages 139-165.
    4. Clark Don P. & Highfill Jannett & de Oliveira Campino Jonas & Rehman Scheherazade S., 2011. "FDI, Technology Spillovers, Growth, and Income Inequality: A Selective Survey," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 11(2), pages 1-44, July.
    5. Dalila Nicet-Chenaf & Eric Rougier, 2014. "Source and host country volatility and FDI : A gravity analysis of European investment to Middle East and North Africa," Larefi Working Papers 1405, Larefi, Université Bordeaux 4.
    6. repec:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:312-320 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Jellal, Mohamed, 2014. "Diaspora transferts et volatilité économique
      [Diaspora transfers and economic volatility]
      ," MPRA Paper 57288, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; economic growth; volatility; cointegration; ASEAN; ARDL;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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