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Proximity Preservation in an Anonymous Framework

Author

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  • Daniel Eckert

    () (Institute of Public Economics, University of Graz)

Abstract

This paper gives a formulation for the condition of preservation of preference proximity which, unlike previous formulations, respects the spirit of anonymity pervading social choice theory. Proximity preservation is however shown to be inconsistent with a very weak condition guaranteeing a minimal non-trivial compensation of pivotal changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Eckert, 2004. "Proximity Preservation in an Anonymous Framework," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 4(6), pages 1-6.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-04d70002
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lauwers, Luc, 2000. "Topological social choice," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-39, July.
    2. Graciela Chichilnisky, 1982. "Social Aggregation Rules and Continuity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 97(2), pages 337-352.
    3. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1979. "On fixed point theorems and social choice paradoxes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 347-351.
    4. Nick Baigent, 1987. "Preference Proximity and Anonymous Social Choice," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(1), pages 161-169.
    5. Fritz Grafe & Julius Grafe, 2001. "Social Welfare Functions which preserve distances," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 18(1), pages 59-64.
    6. Nick Baigent & Daniel Eckert, 2004. "Abstract Aggregations and Proximity Preservation: An Impossibility Result," Theory and Decision, Springer, pages 359-366.
    7. Wilson, Robert, 1972. "Social choice theory without the Pareto Principle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 478-486, December.
    8. Baigent, Nick, 1985. "Anonymity and continuous social choice," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 1-4, February.
    9. Daniel Eckert & Benjamin Lane, 2002. "Anonymity, ordinal preference proximity and imposed social choices," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 19(3), pages 681-684.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making

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