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Regional Effects Of Monetary Policy: Turkey Case

Author

Listed:
  • Hasan Engin DURAN
  • Umut ERDEM

Abstract

Monetary policy is primarily designed for national purposes, say price stability. However, its impact may vary significantly across regions. Why some regions respond more strongly to monetary policy is a challenging topic both theoretically and empirically. Indeed, three main hypothesis on this issue have been put forward: (i) regions with high share of manufacturing, (ii) regions that include higher proportion of small-scale firms and banks, (iii) regions which are more open to trade are likely to respond more strongly to changes in monetary policy. Although these hypotheses have been thoroughly and heatedly discussed by a strand of scholars, far little attention has been paid to the role of geographical factors and spatial spillovers. In fact, we precisely address this issue. Aim of the present paper is to examine the validity of three hypotheses and, additionally, the role of spatial spillovers in regional monetary transmission mechanism in Turkey. Our analyses indicate three major results: First, provinces respond quite heterogeneously to unexpected changes in monetary policy. Second, spatial spillovers and geographical proximity clearly matter in monetary transmission such that neighboring regions are likely to exhibit similar reactions to monetary policy. Third, among the hypothesis above bank size and trade openess are found to be significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Hasan Engin DURAN & Umut ERDEM, 2014. "Regional Effects Of Monetary Policy: Turkey Case," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(1), pages 133-144.
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:eerese:v:14:y2014:i:1_10
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    File URL: http://www.usc.es/~economet/reviews/eers14110.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ferhan Gezici & Geoffrey J. D. Hewings, 2007. "Spatial Analysis of Regional Inequalities in Turkey," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 383-403, April.
    2. Michael Owyang & Howard Wall, 2009. "Regional VARs and the channels of monetary policy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(12), pages 1191-1194.
    3. Ageliki Anagnostou & Stephanos Papadamou, 2012. "The effects of Monetary Policy shocks across the Greek Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa12p507, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Stephen D. Oliner & Glenn D. Rudebusch, 1996. "Is there a broad credit channel for monetary policy?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 3-13.
    5. Julide Yıldırım & Nadir Öcal, 2006. "Income Inequality and Economic Convergence in Turkey," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 13(3), pages 559-568, October.
    6. Hasan Engin Duran, 2013. "Convergence Of Regional Economic Cycles In Turkey," Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(3), pages 152-175, November.
    7. Jeremy C. Stein & Anil K. Kashyap, 2000. "What Do a Million Observations on Banks Say about the Transmission of Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 407-428, June.
    8. Ber, Hedva & Blass, Asher & Yosha, Oved, 2002. "Monetary Policy in an Open Economy: The Differential Impact on Exporting and Non-Exporting Firms," CEPR Discussion Papers 3191, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Theodore M. Crone, 2007. "A pattern of regional differences in the effects of monetary policy," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 9-19.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Spatial Spillovers; Monetary Transmission.;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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