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Do Higher Levels Of Schooling Lead To Higher Returns To Education In Nigeria?

Author

Listed:
  • Lloyd Ahamefule AMAGHIONYEODIWE

    ()

  • Tokunbo Simbowale OSINUBI

    ()

Abstract

The study found that completed years of schooling and experience were to large extent important variables that influenced earnings both in terms of parameters’ significance, direction and magnitude. Wage returns to additional years of schooling completed increased as the level of education increases, thus, the higher the level of education the higher the rate of return to the individual. Also, only the post-schooling years for higher education impacted relevantly in terms of direction and magnitude on earnings of the concerned individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Lloyd Ahamefule AMAGHIONYEODIWE & Tokunbo Simbowale OSINUBI, 2007. "Do Higher Levels Of Schooling Lead To Higher Returns To Education In Nigeria?," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 7(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:eaa:aeinde:v:7:y:2007:i:1_14
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Amaghionyeodiwe, L.A. & Osinubi, T.S., 2006. "The Nigerian Educational Systems and Returns to Education," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 3(1), pages 31-40.
    2. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Keueger, 1991. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(4), pages 979-1014.
    3. Mwabu, Germano & Schultz, T Paul, 2000. "Wage Premiums for Education and Location of South African Workers, by Gender and Race," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(2), pages 307-334, January.
    4. Colm Harmon & Ian Walker, 1996. "The Marginal and Average Returns to Schooling"," Working Papers 96/20, University College Dublin, Economics Department.
    5. Compton Bourne & Anand Dass, 2003. "Private and Social Rates of Return to Higher Education in Science and Technology in a Caribbean Economy," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 1-10.
    6. James Heckman & Justin L. Tobias & Edward Vytlacil, 2003. "Simple Estimators for Treatment Parameters in a Latent-Variable Framework," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 748-755, August.
    7. Biddle, Jeff E & Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1998. "Beauty, Productivity, and Discrimination: Lawyers' Looks and Lucre," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 172-201, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. GUISAN, Maria-Carmen, 2009. "Education, Health And Economic Development: A Survey Of Quantitative Economic Studies, 2001-2009," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 9(1), pages 129-148.

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