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The Contextual Database of the Generations and Gender Programme: Concept, content, and research examples

Author

Listed:
  • Arianna Caporali

    (Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED))

  • Sebastian Klüsener

    (Max-Planck-Institut für Demografische Forschung)

  • Gerda Neyer

    (Stockholms Universitet)

  • Sandra Krapf

    (Universität zu Köln)

  • Olga Grigorieva

    (Max-Planck-Institut für Demografische Forschung)

  • Dora Kostova

    (Max-Planck-Institut für Demografische Forschung)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Arianna Caporali & Sebastian Klüsener & Gerda Neyer & Sandra Krapf & Olga Grigorieva & Dora Kostova, 2016. "The Contextual Database of the Generations and Gender Programme: Concept, content, and research examples," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(9), pages 229-252, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:35:y:2016:i:9
    as

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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol35/9/35-9.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Arianna Caporali & Sebastian Klüsener & Gerda R. Neyer & Sandra Krapf & Olga Grigorieva, 2013. "Providing easy access to cross-country comparative contextual data for demographic research: concept and recent advances of the Generations & Gender Programme Contextual Database," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2013-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Ron Lesthaeghe, 2010. "The Unfolding Story of the Second Demographic Transition," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(2), pages 211-251.
    3. Sebastian Klüsener & Karel Neels & Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2013. "Family Policies and the Western European Fertility Divide: Insights from a Natural Experiment in Belgium," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 39(4), pages 587-610, December.
    4. Máire Ní Bhrolcháin & Tim Dyson, 2007. "On Causation in Demography: Issues and Illustrations," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(1), pages 1-36.
    5. Daniela Del Boca, 2002. "The effect of child care and part time opportunities on participation and fertility decisions in Italy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 549-573.
    6. Trude Lappegård & Sebastian Klüsener & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "Social norms, economic conditions and spatial variation of childbearing within cohabitation across Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2014-002, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    7. Jan M. Hoem, 2008. "Overview Chapter 8: The impact of public policies on European fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(10), pages 249-260, July.
    8. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Gunnar Andersson & Ariane Pailhé, 2012. "Economic Uncertainty and Family Dynamics in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(28), pages 835-852, December.
    9. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2006. "Fertility and women’s employment: a meta-analysis," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-048, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    10. Sandra González-Bailón & Tommy E. Murphy, 2013. "The effects of social interactions on fertility decline in nineteenth-century France: An agent-based simulation experiment," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(2), pages 135-155, July.
    11. Jan M. Hoem & Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2006. "Anticipatory analysis and its alternatives in life-course research. Part 2: Marriage and first birth," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-007, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    12. Gerda R. Neyer, 2003. "Gender and generations dimensions in welfare-state policies," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-022, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    13. Jan M. Hoem & Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2006. "Anticipatory analysis and its alternatives in life-course research. Part 1: Education and first childbearing," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    aggregate data; contextual data; cross-national comparison; cross-regional comparison; database; gender; generations; micro-macro links; multilevel analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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