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Does early childbearing and a sterilization-focused family planning programme in India fuel population growth?

Author

Listed:
  • Zoë Matthews

    (University of Southampton)

  • Sabu S Padmadas

    (University of Southampton)

  • Inge Hutter

    (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen)

  • Juliet McEachran

    (Independent researcher)

  • James Brown

    (University of Technology Sydney)

Abstract

Recent stagnation in the reduction of infant mortality in India can arguably be attributed to early child bearing practices and the lack of progress in lengthening birth intervals. Meanwhile, family planning efforts have been particularly successful in the southern states such as Andhra Pradesh, although family limitation is almost exclusively by means of sterilisation at increasingly younger ages. This paper examines the population impact of the unprecedented convergence of early childbearing trajectories in India and quantifies the potential implications stemming from the neglect of strategies that encourage delaying and spacing of births. The effects of adopting a ‘later, longer and fewer’ family planning strategy are compared with the continuation of fertility concentrated in the younger age groups. Results from the cohort component population projections suggest that a policy encouraging later marriage and birth spacing would achieve a future total population which is about 52 million less in 2050 than if the current early fertility trajectory is continued.

Suggested Citation

  • Zoë Matthews & Sabu S Padmadas & Inge Hutter & Juliet McEachran & James Brown, 2009. "Does early childbearing and a sterilization-focused family planning programme in India fuel population growth?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(28), pages 693-720, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:20:y:2009:i:28
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/28/20-28.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Whitworth, Alison & Stephenson, Rob, 2002. "Birth spacing, sibling rivalry and child mortality in India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(12), pages 2107-2119, December.
    2. Christophe Z. Guilmoto & S. Irudaya Rajan, 2001. "Spatial Patterns of Fertility Transition in Indian Districts," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(4), pages 713-738.
    3. Tim Dyson, 2001. "The Preliminary Demography of the 2001 Census of India," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(2), pages 341-356.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "Demographic Dividends, Dependencies, and Economic Growth in China and India," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 11(3), pages 1-26, Fall.
    2. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2011. "Contrasting Giants: Demographic Change And Economic Performance In China And India," CAMA Working Papers 2011-10, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Desai, Sapna, 2016. "Pragmatic prevention, permanent solution: Women's experiences with hysterectomy in rural India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 11-18.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    census; family planning; fertility; India; National Family Health Surveys (NFHS); population policies; population projections; Sample Registration System (SRB); sterilisation;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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